Joshua is a middle-school student in Atlanta.  

An after-school program at the Welcome All Recreation Center, which is hosted by Atlanta CARES, helped Joshua develop stronger reading, writing and comprehension skills, Executive Director of Atlanta CARES Brenda Coleman says.  

“Joshua has shown great enthusiasm about reading… sports-related books,” Coleman says. “While perusing all of the books available for him to read, he said, ‘I can’t believe we have all these books about our people. It’s so hard to choose one.”  

AAP Build-A-Library participantUnited Way of Greater Atlanta’s African-American Partnership helped open up a world of books for Joshua. It gave him a chance to see the contributions others like him have given their community. It’s a moment like this that makes your donation of time and money worth it.  

Atlanta CARES partnered with the Welcome All Recreation Center to bring in a literacy program using books provided through AAP’s “Powering the Potential” grant 

AAP is a United Way of Greater Atlanta affinity group, and they help provide books and other learning materials for Atlanta CARES and other locations across Greater Atlanta  

AAP launched June 2000 under the African American Initiative moniker by Conchita Robinson and Charles Stephens with the purpose of increasing financial participation and volunteers from our community — there was also this real desire to make United Way’s donor base more reflective of the demographics in Atlanta where they serve. 

AAP is open to donors with shared affinities for philanthropy, leadership and service, and members of AAP donate $1,000 a year or more to United Way of Greater Atlanta.  

Your funds go directly back into this community and power potential in young black men across Greater Atlanta. 

Coleman says Joshua loves his “literacy parties” with his friends where he can eat pizza and talk about books he’s read. 

“The Powering the Potential program is beneficial to Joshua and the other students because it provides a platform for them to improve their word attack skills, comprehension skills, writing skills and speaking skills,” Coleman says. “Most importantly, it has enhanced their joy of reading.” 

To help other young men in Atlanta enhance their joy of reading, join the African-American Partnership today. Email AAP@unitedwayatlanta.org to learn more. 

Antonio had “some hiccups” toward the end of 2018, but he wasn’t going to let these missteps define him. 

The teenager has been involved with Raising Expectations Inc. (RE) for the past two years, says Tangee Allen, executive director of Raising Expectations. RE teamed up with United Way of Greater Atlanta’s African-American Partnership to help others in Greater Atlanta like Antonio.   

AAP helped provide books and other learning materials for different locations across Greater Atlanta through the Build-A-Library program. APP celebrates its 20th anniversary this year with its fifth-annual Leadership Luncheon on Feb. 29, 2020.  

The partnership launched June 2000 under the African American Initiative moniker by Conchita Robinson and Charles Stephens with the purpose of increasing financial participation and volunteers from our community  

AAP is open to donors with shared affinities for philanthropy, leadership and service, and members of AAP donate $1,000 a year or more to United Way of Greater Atlanta.  

Through RE’s program, Antonio wrote a book he called, “It was sooo easy,” and Allen says this became a catalyst in his life. 

Antonio got to see a book he created from start to finish. It encouraged him at school and he excelled academically because of that. Antonio has begun to “reclaim his narrative,” Allen says. In January, Antonio became a junior mentor to RE’s fourth-grade students.  

You can help other students like Antonio find their narrative, find their passion and it doesn’t take much to help make a drastic change in this community.  

In fact, it’s “sooo easy.”  

You can help other students like Antonio by joining the African-American Partnership today. Email AAP@unitedwayatlanta.org to learn more. 

  

Donald is enthusiastic about reading. But it hasn’t always been like this.  

Now, Donald is eager to share with his friends the books he is reading during discussions at Welcome All Recreation Center in Atlanta.  

Donald is a middle schooler in College Park. He got involved with an after-school program through Atlanta CARES that uses books provided by United Way of Greater Atlanta’s African-American Partnership’s “Powering the Potential” grant.  

When you join AAP, you help provide books and other materials for Atlanta CARES and other locations across Greater Atlanta through its Build-A-Library program. 

AAP launched June 2000 under the African American Initiative moniker by Conchita Robinson and Charles Stephens with the purpose of increasing financial participation and volunteers from our community — there was also this real desire to make United Way’s donor base more reflective of the demographics in Atlanta where they serve. 

AAP is open to donors with shared affinities for philanthropy, leadership and service, and members of AAP donate $1,000 a year or more to United Way of Greater Atlanta.  

Donald was immediately drawn to graphic novels and he says this is the genre he prefers.  

“I have noticed tremendous improvement in Donald’s writing skills when he completes his ‘Response to Literature’ forms during our literacy sessions,” says Executive Director of Atlanta CARES Brenda Coleman. “I attribute his improved writing skills and his ability to become a fluent reader to his involvement in our Powering the Potential Program.”   

This is what happens when you give to program’s like AAP. You can help give a young man a love for reading. It doesn’t take much to change someone’s story and empower them to reach their potential.  

To help other young men like Donald improve their reading and writing skills, join the African-American Partnership today. Email AAP@unitedwayatlanta.org to learn more. 

 

Todderick says the Georgia State University African American Male Initiative helped him learn leadership and social skills he needed to become an adult 

Todderick is a freshman in college, but he attended African American Male Initiative meetings during his junior year of high school. AAMI is an initiative funded through United Way of Greater Atlanta’s African-American Partnership “Build-A-Library” program.

AAP is a United Way of Greater Atlanta affinity group, and they help provide books and other learning materials for agencies across Greater Atlanta through Build-A-Library. APP celebrates its 20th anniversary this year with its fifth-annual Leadership Luncheon on Feb. 29, 2020.  

The partnership launched June 2000 by Conchita Robinson and Charles Stephens with the purpose of increasing financial participation and volunteers from our community. 

AAP is open to donors with shared affinities for philanthropy, leadership and service, and members of AAP donate $1,000 a year or more to United Way of Greater Atlanta.  

AAMI helped Todderick become social and comfortable speaking to others. During his junior year of high school, Todderick got the opportunity to create his own graphic novel comic series. It was fun for him and it helped him become engaged with the program, he says. 

“One of my high points in the program was creating the graphic novel because I realized it created a way to talk about ourselves,” Todderick says.  

AAP gave him that opportunity to express himself. This is just one example of the thousands of lives impacted by your gift to AAP. You have the opportunity to help empower others like him to reach his full potential.  

To help others like Todderick prepare for college, join the African-American Partnership today. Email AAP@unitedwayatlanta.org to learn more. 

Trevion is the definition of a champion. 

Carita Jackson, associate executive director of the Andrew and Walter Young Family YMCA in Atlanta, knows Trevion well.

 Jackson says she’s known him for almost two years now, and in that time, she’s watched him “master the art of utilizing his pain to create gains,” Jackson says. 

 Trevion is involved in the African-American Partnership’s Build-A-Library program at the Andrew and Walter Young Family YMCA. AAP is a United Way of Greater Atlanta affinity group, and they help provide books and other learning materials for YMCA and other agencies across Greater Atlanta through Build-A-Library. APP celebrates its 20th anniversary this year with its fifth-annual Leadership Luncheon on Feb. 29, 2020.  

 The partnership launched June 2000 under the African American Initiative moniker by Conchita Robinson and Charles Stephens with the purpose of increasing financial participation and volunteers from our community. 

 AAP is open to donors with shared affinities for philanthropy, leadership and service, and members of AAP donate $1,000 a year or more to United Way of Greater Atlanta.  

Those dollars go directly into this community and help other young men like Trevion become champions, too. Giving to AAP helps empower others to make change in their life and a difference in their community. Don’t you want to be a part of that change?  

 This program has put him in a position to teach his peers how to hold each other accountable for their actions, how to be young men and women of integrity and see how easy it is to be successful if you put in the work needed to attract success,” Jackson says.  

To help create champions like Trevion, join the African-American Partnership today. Email AAP@unitedwayatlanta.org to learn more. 

 

Quentin has learned that he can use his voice to spark change in his community. United Way of Greater Atlanta’s African-American Partnership helped him find his voice.   

Carita Jackson, associate executive director of the Andrew and Walter Young Family YMCA in Atlanta, speaks fondly of the teenager. She says after nearly two years of working with Quentin, she has seen him become a leader among his peers.  

Quentin is involved in AAP’s Build-A-Library program at the Andrew and Walter Young Family YMCA. AAP is a United Way of Greater Atlanta affinity group. They help provide books and other learning materials for YMCA and other locations across Greater AtlantaAAis celebrating its 20th anniversary this year with its fifth-annual Leadership Luncheon 

The partnership launched June 2000 under the African American Initiative moniker by Conchita Robinson and Charles Stephens with the purpose of increasing financial participation and volunteers from our community.  

AAP is open to donors with shared affinities for philanthropy, leadership and service, and members of AAP donate $1,000 a year or more to United Way of Greater Atlanta.  

Those funds go back into this community and help young men like Quentin see their true potential and how they can achieve it. That’s what your dollars help do for this community.  

Quentin has become a leader in his community. He was the first teen to win the Dr. Walter Young Unsung Hero Award, which is given to those that “selflessly give of their time and talents to help create positive change.”  

You can help others in Atlanta create positive change, join the African-American Partnership today. Email AAP@unitedwayatlanta.org to learn more. 

Akin participated in Raising Expectations Inc’s African-American Partnership program for the past two years — he even wrote a children’s book through the “Boys, Books and Brotherhood” initiative.  

 Akin is currently a student at Georgia State University majoring in computer science. 

The teenager titled his book, “I’m Possible,” and he’s embodied that theme during his first semester of college. United Way of Greater Atlanta’s African-American Partnership helped Akin write and publish his book.  

Over the years, AAP helped provide books and other learning materials for different locations across Greater Atlanta through the Build-A-Library program. APP celebrates its 20th anniversary this year with its fifth-annual Leadership Luncheon on Feb. 29, 2020.  

The partnership launched June 2000 under the African American Initiative moniker by Conchita Robinson and Charles Stephens with the purpose of increasing financial participation and volunteers from our community 

AAP is open to donors with shared affinities for philanthropy, leadership and service, and members of AAP donate $1,000 a year or more to United Way of Greater Atlanta. Currently, AAP has more than 1,000 members and raises more than $2 million annually.  

That money goes right back into this community to help other teenagers and young men like Akin. You can help others like him realize that nothing is impossible. You can give them those resources to achieve anything they set their mind to — to reach their fullest potential.  

Give back to your community and AAP, and you can help empower young men like Akin. Join the African-American Partnership today and email AAP@unitedwayatlanta.org to learn more. 

Atlanta CARES was given numerous opportunities to engage and recruit more mentors for young black men in South Fulton because of United Way of Greater Atlanta’s African-American Partnership.

Atlanta CARES recruits mentors through partnerships with the South Fulton Arrow Leadership Council and Real Dads Read. Build-A-Library has helped them provide more exposure to the community about the programs available for the youth, Atlanta CARES’ Brenda Coleman says.

“In essence, the Build-A-Library project has enhanced the marketing of our program immensely,” Brenda says.

One student, Asheki Wilkins, a student from Woodland Middle School, read the book “Nightjohn” by Gary Paulsen, a story following a slave from the pre-Civil War South who taught others on his plantation to read and write.

“My favorite character was Nightjohn because he was determined to teach different people how to read and write,” Asheki says. “The book reminded me of my family members and my ancestors.”

AAP’s Build-A-Library program supplies local community centers with books and other learning resources for different locations across Greater Atlanta.

United Way of Greater Atlanta’s African-American Partnership was established 20 years ago to engage an underrepresented population of United Way giving societies.

APP celebrates its 20th anniversary this year with its fifth-annual Leadership Luncheon on Feb. 29, 2020.

The partnership launched June 2000 under the African American Initiative moniker by Conchita Robinson and Charles Stephens with the purpose of increasing financial participation and volunteers from our community — there was also this real desire to make United Way’s donor base more reflective of the demographics in Atlanta where they serve. AAP committed itself to addressing achievement gaps and improving outcomes for African-American boys and young men in the Greater Atlanta region by offering resources and mentorship.

AAP is open to donors with shared affinities for philanthropy, leadership and service, and members of AAP donate $1,000 a year or more to United Way of Greater Atlanta. Currently, AAP has more than 1,000 members and raises more than $2 million annually.

That money feeds into United Way’s overall goal of improving the well-being of more than 250,000 children in Greater Atlanta’s 13 counties by 2027.

United Way saw after its strategic planning meeting two years ago that the zip code a child lived in too often determined the fate of that child. United Way saw that, statistically, because of what zip code a child was born into, he or she was handed a disadvantage beyond their control. Through a set of 14 measures, United Way calculated at the time a child well-being score of 58.9.

On May 9, officials announced the score had improved in two years to 61.8. That equates to a change in the lives of more than 82,000 children in the region living in low or very low child well-being. By using the child as the lens, we can identify the big picture needs of the community, such as a need for essential educational resources for these communities.

“The major success of our program is evidence that students have truly begun to develop a joy of reading,” Brenda says.

To help power the potential of young men like Asheki and help them develop a love for reading, join the join the African-American Partnership. Email AAP@unitedwayatlanta.org to learn more.

Gavin McGuire worked previously with the Andrew and Walter Young Family YMCA in Atlanta where students on campus participated in activities funded through United Way of Greater Atlanta’s African-American Partnership.

McGuire said he and the staff at YMCA conducted a series of sessions to first gauge the interest in reading among the middle and high school students. He said about 20 of them were selected who had a passion for writing a book or novel to serve as the first class to participate in the YMCA’s “Writes of Passage” program.

He said that at mid-year there were about 15 total sessions, workshops, tutorials and reading groups on campus for these teenagers — teenagers like Denard Baker.

“There are many success stories that have been identified since the launch of our program,” Gavin said in March 2018. “Denard Baker has been impacted tremendously by this initiative.”

Gavin said Denard attended Kipps Ways Academy and credited this program with increasing his reading comprehension and writing.

The Writes of Passage program was funded through AAP’s Build-A-Library initiative. AAP has provided books and other learning materials for many locations across Greater Atlanta through this Build-A-Library program.

United Way of Greater Atlanta’s African-American Partnership was established 20 years ago to engage an underrepresented population of United Way giving societies.

APP celebrates its 20th anniversary this year with its fifth-annual Leadership Luncheon on Feb. 29, 2020.

The partnership launched June 2000 under the African American Initiative moniker by Conchita Robinson and Charles Stephens with the purpose of increasing financial participation and volunteers from our community — there was also this real desire to make United Way’s donor base more reflective of the demographics in Atlanta where they serve. AAP committed itself to addressing achievement gaps and improving outcomes for African-American boys and young men in the Greater Atlanta region by offering resources and mentorship.

AAP is open to donors with shared affinities for philanthropy, leadership and service, and members of AAP donate $1,000 a year or more to United Way of Greater Atlanta. Currently, AAP has more than 1,000 members and raises more than $2 million annually.

That money feeds into United Way’s overall goal of improving the well-being of more than 250,000 children in Greater Atlanta’s 13 counties by 2027.

United Way saw after its strategic planning meeting two years ago that the zip code a child lived in too often determined the fate of that child. United Way saw that, statistically, because of what zip code a child was born into, he or she was handed a disadvantage beyond their control. Through a set of 14 measures, United Way calculated at the time a child well-being score of 58.9.

On May 9, officials announced the score had improved in two years to 61.8. That equates to a change in the lives of more than 82,000 children in the region living in low or very low child well-being. By using the child as the lens, we can identify the big picture needs of the community, such as a need for essential educational resources for these communities.

Gavin said he could already see the impact that the program had on Denard’s confidence.

“In such a short period, he has increased his vocabulary and his overall reading comprehension,” Gavin says. “The interaction with the mentors and session facilitators has provided consistent interaction with positive role models for Denard.”

To give back to your community, and be a positive role model to other young men across Greater Atlanta, join the African-American Partnership. Email AAP@unitedwayatlanta.org to learn more.

Derrick Brown clutches a “Black Panther” book close to his chest, right against his heart. He told Brenda Coleman, executive director at Atlanta CARES, that reading the book made him feel “like a king.”

“It made him proud of his African heritage,” Brenda says. “He also mentioned that he wanted to help his classmates solve problems and get along better just like the characters in the book eventually learned to do.”

Derrick was participating at one of the Build-A-Library sites funded by United Way of Greater Atlanta through the African-American Partnership affinity group. AAP has provided books and other learning materials for different locations across Greater Atlanta through this Build-A-Library program.

United Way of Greater Atlanta’s African-American Partnership was established 20 years ago to engage an underrepresented population of United Way giving societies.

APP celebrates its 20th anniversary this year with its fifth-annual Leadership Luncheon on Feb. 29, 2020.

The partnership launched June 2000 under an African American Initiative moniker by Conchita Robinson and Charles Stephens with the purpose of increasing financial participation and volunteers from our community — there was also this real desire to make United Way’s donor base more reflective of the demographics in Atlanta where they serve. AAP committed itself to addressing achievement gaps and improving outcomes for African-American boys and young men in the Greater Atlanta region by offering resources and mentorship.

AAP is open to donors with shared affinities for philanthropy, leadership and service, and members of AAP donate $1,000 a year or more to United Way of Greater Atlanta. Currently, AAP has more than 1,000 members and raises more than $2 million annually.

That money feeds into United Way’s overall goal of improving the well-being of more than 250,000 children in Greater Atlanta’s 13 counties by 2027.

United Way saw after its strategic planning meeting two years ago that the zip code a child lived in too often determined the fate of that child. United Way saw that, statistically, because of what zip code a child was born into, he or she was handed a disadvantage beyond their control. Through a set of 14 measures, United Way calculated at the time a child well-being score of 58.9.

On May 9, officials announced the score had improved in two years to 61.8. That equates to a change in the lives of more than 82,000 children in the region living in low or very low child well-being. By using the child as the lens, we can identify the big picture needs of the community, such as a need for essential educational resources for these communities.

Brenda said Derrick got the book at one of her nonprofit’s “Real Dads Read” event. Where he, like many other students, discussed their favorite book characters, events and valuable lessons learned in the book.

“The success I witnessed was the students’ enthusiasm about books in all of our partner organizations,” Brenda says. “One of the students… stated, ‘I like reading these brand new books with pictures of my people.’”

She said students at the library got a heightened interest in reading because of the culturally authentic books that students could relate to. Brenda said Derrick “started his own book club with four of his friends on his own, and they read “Black Panther” together.

“Reading the book together enhanced their joy of reading,” she says.

To give back to your community and help power the potential of other young men like Derrick, join the African-American Partnership. Email AAP@unitedwayatlanta.org to learn more.