Akin participated in Raising Expectations Inc’s African-American Partnership program for the past two years — he even wrote a children’s book through the “Boys, Books and Brotherhood” initiative.  

 Akin is currently a student at Georgia State University majoring in computer science. 

The teenager titled his book, “I’m Possible,” and he’s embodied that theme during his first semester of college. United Way of Greater Atlanta’s African-American Partnership helped Akin write and publish his book.  

Over the years, AAP helped provide books and other learning materials for different locations across Greater Atlanta through the Build-A-Library program. APP celebrates its 20th anniversary this year with its fifth-annual Leadership Luncheon on Feb. 29, 2020.  

The partnership launched June 2000 under the African American Initiative moniker by Conchita Robinson and Charles Stephens with the purpose of increasing financial participation and volunteers from our community 

AAP is open to donors with shared affinities for philanthropy, leadership and service, and members of AAP donate $1,000 a year or more to United Way of Greater Atlanta. Currently, AAP has more than 1,000 members and raises more than $2 million annually.  

That money goes right back into this community to help other teenagers and young men like Akin. You can help others like him realize that nothing is impossible. You can give them those resources to achieve anything they set their mind to — to reach their fullest potential.  

Give back to your community and AAP, and you can help empower young men like Akin. Join the African-American Partnership today and email AAP@unitedwayatlanta.org to learn more. 

Atlanta CARES was given numerous opportunities to engage and recruit more mentors for young black men in South Fulton because of United Way of Greater Atlanta’s African-American Partnership.

Atlanta CARES recruits mentors through partnerships with the South Fulton Arrow Leadership Council and Real Dads Read. Build-A-Library has helped them provide more exposure to the community about the programs available for the youth, Atlanta CARES’ Brenda Coleman says.

“In essence, the Build-A-Library project has enhanced the marketing of our program immensely,” Brenda says.

One student, Asheki Wilkins, a student from Woodland Middle School, read the book “Nightjohn” by Gary Paulsen, a story following a slave from the pre-Civil War South who taught others on his plantation to read and write.

“My favorite character was Nightjohn because he was determined to teach different people how to read and write,” Asheki says. “The book reminded me of my family members and my ancestors.”

AAP’s Build-A-Library program supplies local community centers with books and other learning resources for different locations across Greater Atlanta.

United Way of Greater Atlanta’s African-American Partnership was established 20 years ago to engage an underrepresented population of United Way giving societies.

APP celebrates its 20th anniversary this year with its fifth-annual Leadership Luncheon on Feb. 29, 2020.

The partnership launched June 2000 under the African American Initiative moniker by Conchita Robinson and Charles Stephens with the purpose of increasing financial participation and volunteers from our community — there was also this real desire to make United Way’s donor base more reflective of the demographics in Atlanta where they serve. AAP committed itself to addressing achievement gaps and improving outcomes for African-American boys and young men in the Greater Atlanta region by offering resources and mentorship.

AAP is open to donors with shared affinities for philanthropy, leadership and service, and members of AAP donate $1,000 a year or more to United Way of Greater Atlanta. Currently, AAP has more than 1,000 members and raises more than $2 million annually.

That money feeds into United Way’s overall goal of improving the well-being of more than 250,000 children in Greater Atlanta’s 13 counties by 2027.

United Way saw after its strategic planning meeting two years ago that the zip code a child lived in too often determined the fate of that child. United Way saw that, statistically, because of what zip code a child was born into, he or she was handed a disadvantage beyond their control. Through a set of 14 measures, United Way calculated at the time a child well-being score of 58.9.

On May 9, officials announced the score had improved in two years to 61.8. That equates to a change in the lives of more than 82,000 children in the region living in low or very low child well-being. By using the child as the lens, we can identify the big picture needs of the community, such as a need for essential educational resources for these communities.

“The major success of our program is evidence that students have truly begun to develop a joy of reading,” Brenda says.

To help power the potential of young men like Asheki and help them develop a love for reading, join the join the African-American Partnership. Email AAP@unitedwayatlanta.org to learn more.

#WhyWednesday: Angela Anderson

Angela Anderson of the Southern Education Foundation takes action to improve our communities as a member of United Way of Greater Atlanta African-American Partnership. Today, hear why.

 

 

AAP members donate their time, skills and financial resources to build brighter futures for the next generation—so that every child can reach their full potential. Want to make your mark and create positive change for communities in Greater Atlanta? Check out our upcoming AAP Leadership Luncheon or AAP Day of Service.

Gavin McGuire worked previously with the Andrew and Walter Young Family YMCA in Atlanta where students on campus participated in activities funded through United Way of Greater Atlanta’s African-American Partnership.

McGuire said he and the staff at YMCA conducted a series of sessions to first gauge the interest in reading among the middle and high school students. He said about 20 of them were selected who had a passion for writing a book or novel to serve as the first class to participate in the YMCA’s “Writes of Passage” program.

He said that at mid-year there were about 15 total sessions, workshops, tutorials and reading groups on campus for these teenagers — teenagers like Denard Baker.

“There are many success stories that have been identified since the launch of our program,” Gavin said in March 2018. “Denard Baker has been impacted tremendously by this initiative.”

Gavin said Denard attended Kipps Ways Academy and credited this program with increasing his reading comprehension and writing.

The Writes of Passage program was funded through AAP’s Build-A-Library initiative. AAP has provided books and other learning materials for many locations across Greater Atlanta through this Build-A-Library program.

United Way of Greater Atlanta’s African-American Partnership was established 20 years ago to engage an underrepresented population of United Way giving societies.

APP celebrates its 20th anniversary this year with its fifth-annual Leadership Luncheon on Feb. 29, 2020.

The partnership launched June 2000 under the African American Initiative moniker by Conchita Robinson and Charles Stephens with the purpose of increasing financial participation and volunteers from our community — there was also this real desire to make United Way’s donor base more reflective of the demographics in Atlanta where they serve. AAP committed itself to addressing achievement gaps and improving outcomes for African-American boys and young men in the Greater Atlanta region by offering resources and mentorship.

AAP is open to donors with shared affinities for philanthropy, leadership and service, and members of AAP donate $1,000 a year or more to United Way of Greater Atlanta. Currently, AAP has more than 1,000 members and raises more than $2 million annually.

That money feeds into United Way’s overall goal of improving the well-being of more than 250,000 children in Greater Atlanta’s 13 counties by 2027.

United Way saw after its strategic planning meeting two years ago that the zip code a child lived in too often determined the fate of that child. United Way saw that, statistically, because of what zip code a child was born into, he or she was handed a disadvantage beyond their control. Through a set of 14 measures, United Way calculated at the time a child well-being score of 58.9.

On May 9, officials announced the score had improved in two years to 61.8. That equates to a change in the lives of more than 82,000 children in the region living in low or very low child well-being. By using the child as the lens, we can identify the big picture needs of the community, such as a need for essential educational resources for these communities.

Gavin said he could already see the impact that the program had on Denard’s confidence.

“In such a short period, he has increased his vocabulary and his overall reading comprehension,” Gavin says. “The interaction with the mentors and session facilitators has provided consistent interaction with positive role models for Denard.”

To give back to your community, and be a positive role model to other young men across Greater Atlanta, join the African-American Partnership. Email AAP@unitedwayatlanta.org to learn more.

Derrick Brown clutches a “Black Panther” book close to his chest, right against his heart. He told Brenda Coleman, executive director at Atlanta CARES, that reading the book made him feel “like a king.”

“It made him proud of his African heritage,” Brenda says. “He also mentioned that he wanted to help his classmates solve problems and get along better just like the characters in the book eventually learned to do.”

Derrick was participating at one of the Build-A-Library sites funded by United Way of Greater Atlanta through the African-American Partnership affinity group. AAP has provided books and other learning materials for different locations across Greater Atlanta through this Build-A-Library program.

United Way of Greater Atlanta’s African-American Partnership was established 20 years ago to engage an underrepresented population of United Way giving societies.

APP celebrates its 20th anniversary this year with its fifth-annual Leadership Luncheon on Feb. 29, 2020.

The partnership launched June 2000 under an African American Initiative moniker by Conchita Robinson and Charles Stephens with the purpose of increasing financial participation and volunteers from our community — there was also this real desire to make United Way’s donor base more reflective of the demographics in Atlanta where they serve. AAP committed itself to addressing achievement gaps and improving outcomes for African-American boys and young men in the Greater Atlanta region by offering resources and mentorship.

AAP is open to donors with shared affinities for philanthropy, leadership and service, and members of AAP donate $1,000 a year or more to United Way of Greater Atlanta. Currently, AAP has more than 1,000 members and raises more than $2 million annually.

That money feeds into United Way’s overall goal of improving the well-being of more than 250,000 children in Greater Atlanta’s 13 counties by 2027.

United Way saw after its strategic planning meeting two years ago that the zip code a child lived in too often determined the fate of that child. United Way saw that, statistically, because of what zip code a child was born into, he or she was handed a disadvantage beyond their control. Through a set of 14 measures, United Way calculated at the time a child well-being score of 58.9.

On May 9, officials announced the score had improved in two years to 61.8. That equates to a change in the lives of more than 82,000 children in the region living in low or very low child well-being. By using the child as the lens, we can identify the big picture needs of the community, such as a need for essential educational resources for these communities.

Brenda said Derrick got the book at one of her nonprofit’s “Real Dads Read” event. Where he, like many other students, discussed their favorite book characters, events and valuable lessons learned in the book.

“The success I witnessed was the students’ enthusiasm about books in all of our partner organizations,” Brenda says. “One of the students… stated, ‘I like reading these brand new books with pictures of my people.’”

She said students at the library got a heightened interest in reading because of the culturally authentic books that students could relate to. Brenda said Derrick “started his own book club with four of his friends on his own, and they read “Black Panther” together.

“Reading the book together enhanced their joy of reading,” she says.

To give back to your community and help power the potential of other young men like Derrick, join the African-American Partnership. Email AAP@unitedwayatlanta.org to learn more.

#WhyWednesday: Youlanda Mack

Youlanda Mack’s pathway to college began with a nonprofit that became her “compass” as she navigated the college preparation and application process. Years later, that experience continues to inspire her passion for giving back.

Today, hear why Youlanda Mack has joined the child well-being movement as a United Way AAP board member and mentor for youth:

United Way of Greater Atlanta’s African-American Partnership empowers community champions like Youlanda to make a lasting impact on our youth and our region. This year, United Way AAP is celebrating 20 years of making a difference in the lives of children and communities! Ready to get involved? Click here to learn more about joining AAP.

The mother of a teenager in the 30310 zip code of Atlanta was afraid her son’s school didn’t have the resources he needed to become successful.

“She wanted to move him to another school, but he didn’t have the money to relocate her family to another community,” says Michael Supreme, teen director of the Andrew and Walter Young Family YMCA.

The young man, Quinton, was joined by 50 other students like himself at the YMCA who participated in after-school college and career readiness sessions, which include college tours, college workshops and Science, Technology, Engineering and Math workshops and field trips over the course of the past year.

Supreme says the students also learned about leadership and civic engagement, and they were required to conduct at least one “impact project” each month. He said the students were interested in “expanding the scope of the program.”

These sessions were funded as part of United Way of Greater Atlanta’s African-American Partnership Build-A-Library program.

“We lacked resources and funding support for our middle and high school initiatives,” Supreme says. “This funding aided us to provide content to this demographic of participants.”

Build-A-Library sites are funded by United Way of Greater Atlanta through the African-American Partnership affinity group. AAP has provided books and other learning materials for different locations across Greater Atlanta through this Build-A-Library program.

United Way of Greater Atlanta’s African-American Partnership was established 20 years ago to engage an underrepresented population of United Way giving societies.

APP celebrates its 20th anniversary this year with its fifth-annual Leadership Luncheon on Feb. 29, 2020.

The partnership launched June 2000 under an African American Initiative moniker by Conchita Robinson and Charles Stephens with the purpose of increasing financial participation and volunteers from our community — there was also this real desire to make United Way’s donor base more reflective of the demographics in Atlanta where they serve. AAP committed itself to addressing achievement gaps and improving outcomes for African-American boys and young men in the Greater Atlanta region by offering resources and mentorship.

AAP is open to donors with shared affinities for philanthropy, leadership and service, and members of AAP donate $1,000 a year or more to United Way of Greater Atlanta. Currently, AAP has more than 1,000 members and raises more than $2 million annually.

That money feeds into United Way’s overall goal of improving the well-being of more than 250,000 children in Greater Atlanta’s 13 counties by 2027.

United Way saw after its strategic planning meeting two years ago that the zip code a child lived in too often determined the fate of that child. United Way saw that, statistically, because of what zip code a child was born into, he or she was handed a disadvantage beyond their control. Through a set of 14 measures, United Way calculated at the time a child well-being score of 58.9.

On May 9, officials announced the score had improved in two years to 61.8. That equates to a change in the lives of more than 82,000 children in the region living in low or very low child well-being. By using the child as the lens, we can identify the big picture needs of the community, such as a need for essential educational resources for these communities.

Quinton’s mother “credits this program with inspiring her son and for providing him with the access to the tools and experiences that he needs to continue to successfully grow and develop,” Supreme says.

“Quinton identified his spark as being an engineer,” Supreme says. “He is interested in attending college at Georgia Tech. He is a peer leader who recruits others to join this initiative and other programs at YMCA.”

AAP & Tocqueville Society Member Spotlight: Youlanda Mack

AAPTocqueville Society Member, Youlanda Mack
IT Technical Lead for Oracle ERP and Cloud Applications
Cox Enterprises, Inc.

Tell us about your role at Cox Enterprises and how you impact the company’s strategic goals?

As an IT technical lead for ERP and Oracle Applications, I am responsible for the operational support of the PeopleSoft Human Capital Management (HCM) and Autonomous Oracle Integration Cloud Applications.  My day-to-day HCM responsibilities include the overall management of data and infrastructures that run applications for all Cox companies (CEI Enterprises, Cox Communication & Cox Automotive). These activities can range from hardware infrastructure support, database management, application modifications\migrations, and batch performance for HR related jobs such as employee benefits and payroll. I also support application modification and system uptime consumptions for the processing of cloud interfaces for with Cox Suppliers and vendors.

Cox is committed to giving back, volunteerism, and mentorship to help server communities. As part of that commitment, all employees of Cox have these values as an individual objective. Cox encourages and offers paid time off for employees to participate and serve local communities and volunteer events that will help to make a better future for the next generation.

As a Cox employee, I have those same values. I am strategically contributing to the Cox company goals by giving and being involved in several corporate and community volunteer events. I am committed to performing my job with integrity while helping to empower people to overcome their challenges and have opportunities to improve their quality of life.


What advice would you give to someone wanting a career in IT?

Almost every aspect of life touches IT and technology so it is a great career choice. Technology continues to grow and change rapidly. I would encourage them explore multiple areas in IT (Automation, Artificial Intelligence, Cloud, Cyber Security, Mobile, Virtual Reality, Web, etc.) and multiple roles (Architect, Business Analyst, Database Administrator, Developer, Software or Security Engineer, etc.) to find an area that you really enjoy working in. I would also advise them to expand their knowledge with continuous learning in IT, soft skills and leadership, set development goals, read books, attend training on a regular basis, and know yourself and accept your flaws. Lastly, I would advise getting a mentor early on in your career to help guide you and provide open and honest feedback.

 

You have a long list of experience volunteering and mentoring in the community. What first sparked your interest in philanthropy and why did you become an AAP Cabinet member?

My interest in in philanthropy is simply because I am a beneficiary of philanthropy myself growing up in a lower income household with a single mother and it is a passion for me to help others. I know firsthand the difference philanthropy has made in my life. I received financial assistance, college entrance exams, college applications, identify college majors, etc. all of which help me attend college. I often think back and appreciate the mentorship, encouragement, lessons, and inspiring words of people who have crossed my path and made me a better person for the sharing of themselves. I am a person of faith and I truly believe “To whom much is given, much will be required (Luke 12:48)”.  Giving back is part of my values, beliefs and gratifying experience. It is also an honor and privilege to share my mentorship, knowledge, finances, service and time volunteering to serve local communities and great causes like the African American Partnership. Being a philanthropist specifically for AAP has the added benefit of being part of my heritage. It is truly a passion and self-fulfillment goal of mine to inspire others to overcome difficult and challenging circumstances. Furthermore, it is embedded in my heart and soul to make a difference in life and beyond myself. Being an AAP Cabinet member provides me the opportunity to do so.

 

You have mentored others in the community, what advice would you give to a younger Youlanda Mack?

First, I would start with the advice of obtaining a couple of mentors. I would have a mentor in my profession to help me navigate my professional career and identify talents that I possibly did not see in myself. I would also have a second mentor that was more experienced in life and a good sounding board to help me with decisions. This second mentor could be another businessperson, coworker, friend or relative that I respect and admire. The two mentors can provide guidance, open and honest feedback from different prospective.

Another piece of advice to my younger self would be to engage in public speaking at a young age. Being an African American female and a minority in the IT field, I believe public speaking would have helped embolden me to communicate more effectively and proficiently. I also believe public speaking builds up your confidence to creatively tell your story to get your idea recognized and shared with others. Ultimately, I believe mastering public speaking improves your overall interactions with others.

As a final point to my younger self; stay true to who you are. Know that what I do now does not define who I am and who I will become later.

 

Who is your favorite American trailblazer that serves as a source of inspiration to you?

I have a list of favorite American Trailblazers but there are two that I really admire. One of my dearest trailblazers is my mother. Her willingness to sacrifice to support me in my aspirations in whatever I chose to do. She supports me 100%. Another great trailblazer for me is Michelle Obama for me. She is one of the most inspiring persons of this decade. I really like her life story and the transparency that she shows in her appearances and speaking engagements. She shares stories and life lessons of her struggles and accolades of how she worked through and succeeded in overcoming life’s challenges. As part of her accolades, she has been presented three honorary doctorate degrees and recently won a Grammy for her spoken word for her memoir “Becoming. Educationally, professionally, personally and her elegance of being the first lady of the 44th U.S. president, Barack Obama represents pure excellence. She certainly inspires African American women to know that we can think differently, dream differently because it is possible to reach our full potential.

A student looks to Dr. Tene Davis during a group discussion at Booker T. Washington High School in Fulton County — he looks dejected as he tells Davis that he struggles with planning and time management.

Davis says the young man tells him that he’s “not good at planning” in a discussion about exploring skills and personality traits.

“[He says] that is something that he would like to improve,” Davis says. “We had a group discussion in which he exclaimed that he feels he, ‘just goes about his day-to-day without much thought.’”

The teenager is joined by 15 other students like him at an after-school session held at the high school. Davis helped lead about 60 sessions over the course of a year at Booker T. Washington High School. The program was a result of a grant funded by United Way of Greater Atlanta’s African-American Partnership (AAP).

Over the course of a year, Davis says facilitators led discussions and activities on topics that were identified to help foster young men’s “black male identity development.” Students attended team-building retreats, college tours, career training fairs and they participated in AAP’s Day of Service.

“We had a core group of dedicated young men who regularly attended weekly sessions and meetings,” Davis says. “We completed a retreat at Georgia State’s Indian Creek Lodge in which the young men completed several unique team building challenges and media training.”

He says these sessions helped fine-tune skills that they were able to take with them to the career fair at the school in the spring. The program was funded through AAP’s Build-A-Library program. Build-A-Library sites are funded by United Way of Greater Atlanta through the African-American Partnership affinity group. AAP has provided books and other learning materials for different locations across Greater Atlanta through this Build-A-Library program.

United Way of Greater Atlanta’s African-American Partnership was established 20 years ago to engage an underrepresented population of United Way giving societies.

APP celebrates its 20th anniversary this year with its fifth-annual Leadership Luncheon on Feb. 29, 2020.

The partnership launched June 2000 under an African American Initiative moniker by Conchita Robinson and Charles Stephens with the purpose of increasing financial participation and volunteers from our community — there was also this real desire to make United Way’s donor base more reflective of the demographics in Atlanta where they serve. AAP committed itself to addressing achievement gaps and improving outcomes for African-American boys and young men in the Greater Atlanta region by offering resources and mentorship.

AAP is open to donors with shared affinities for philanthropy, leadership and service, and members of AAP donate $1,000 a year or more to United Way of Greater Atlanta. Currently, AAP has more than 1,000 members and raises more than $2 million annually.

That money feeds into United Way’s overall goal of improving the well-being of more than 250,000 children in Greater Atlanta’s 13 counties by 2027.

United Way saw after its strategic planning meeting two years ago that the zip code a child lived in too often determined the fate of that child. United Way saw that, statistically, because of what zip code a child was born into, he or she was handed a disadvantage beyond their control. Through a set of 14 measures, United Way calculated at the time a child well-being score of 58.9.

On May 9, officials announced the score had improved in two years to 61.8. That equates to a change in the lives of more than 82,000 children in the region living in low or very low child well-being. By using the child as the lens, we can identify the big picture needs of the community, such as a need for essential educational resources for these communities.

Davis says the participants enjoyed activities that challenged them. They saw positive effects on the young men in areas of identity development, reading for understanding and time management skills.

He brought that one young man’s concerns up for discussion for the rest of the group. It was a learning moment.

“Upon further questioning and exploration, we realized that he is thoughtful and proficient in setting goals, had developed several contingencies or back-up plans, and we demonstrated how these attributes are related to planning and success,” Davis says. “The student expressed understanding and confidence after realizing that this skill he previously believed he lacked was one of his strongest qualities.”

To give back to your community and help power the potential of other young black men, join the African-American Partnership. Email AAP@unitedwayatlanta.org to learn more.

Gene Norman had just finished a long day at work — it was 2001, and Gene was working as a meteorologist for CBS-affiliate WGCL in Atlanta.

It was a Friday night, and a colleague of Gene’s was heading to a party once he left for the day.

“There was an event going on called the ‘Blue Lights in the Basement’ party near Underground Atlanta,” Gene says. “He [his friend] kind of dragged me to the event. We both worked in television, it was our last newscast and I just wanted to go home.”

But Gene obliged — luckily for him. If Gene hadn’t gone with his friend that evening, then he wouldn’t have met the love of his life.

The event was hosted by United Way of Greater Atlanta’s African-American Partnership.

AAP had only been formed a year prior. On Feb. 29, 2020, AAP celebrates its 20th Anniversary with its fifth-annual Leadership Luncheon.

A few blocks away and a few hours prior to meeting Gene, Elaine Mitchell Norman, previous chief information officer of United Way of Greater Atlanta, was encouraged by a friend of hers to go to the event — it had been a “long, busy day” for her, as well.

“It was just one of those things,” Elaine says. “I had had a long, busy day, and I was like, ‘Oh, now I got to go to this thing.’ I had to rush home, get dressed and it seemed like just about everything that could’ve gone wrong went wrong.
“I couldn’t get my stockings to cooperate, I couldn’t find a parking space. But I finally found the place, and as I walked in, the first thing I could see was this crowd of women and they were all pointing and looking, and I was like, ‘What’s happening over there?’”

Gene says he and his colleague were “fairly well known” — after all, they had been on TV every night that week. So, a crowd formed around the two of them.

“The event was great, and it was exciting,” he says. “They had lights and music and everything, so it was fun. I reached over and tapped this lady on the shoulder and said, ‘Would you like to dance?’”

The women in Elaine’s group were all talking about these two single guys from TV, and she says they were talking about Gene’s colleague when she felt the tap on her shoulder.

“I turn around, and it’s Gene Norman,” she says. “We started dancing, and right after we started, it felt like the lights came on for the event to be over. This was an event that usually went until around 2 a.m. or something, and this time it was around midnight.”

Gene didn’t want his time with Elaine to end, though. He asked her if she wanted to go out for coffee and dessert at Café Intermezzo.

“We talked and talked, and at some point, they actually came and tapped us on the shoulder to say it was closing time,” Gene says.

Elaine says the servers were looking at her with arms crossed, visibly upset. Unbeknownst to her, they had flipped over chairs, put them on the tabletops and closed the registers for the night. The two were the only people in the restaurant.

“It was like 4 a.m.,” Elaine says with a laugh. “We didn’t even know we had talked that long.”

Gene and Elaine parted ways that morning, but the two started dating and went on to get married about a year and a half later.

“We’ve been dancing together ever since,” Elaine says.

It’s been close to two decades since they met, and the two have moved on to other jobs and out of the area. They spent time in Houston before moving back to the Greater Atlanta region in the past few years. The 20th anniversary of AAP has given Gene and Elaine each a chance to reconnect with the organization they both used to be so involved in — a chance to give back to a group that has given them both so much.

“It’s because of AAP that I am now married,” Gene says.

United Way of Greater Atlanta’s African-American Partnership was established 20 years ago to engage an underrepresented population of United Way giving societies.

The partnership launched June 2000 under the African American Initiative moniker by Conchita Robinson and Charles Stephens with the purpose of increasing financial participation and volunteers from our community — there was also this real desire to make United Way’s donor base more reflective of the demographics in Atlanta where they serve. AAP committed itself to addressing achievement gaps and improving outcomes for African-American boys and young men in the Greater Atlanta region by offering resources and mentorship.

AAP is open to donors with shared affinities for philanthropy, leadership and service, and members of AAP donate $1,000 a year or more to United Way of Greater Atlanta. Currently, AAP has more than 1,000 members and raises more than $2 million annually.

That money feeds into United Way’s overall goal of improving the well-being of more than 250,000 children in Greater Atlanta’s 13 counties by 2027.

To give back to your community and help power the potential of African-American boys and young men, join the African-American Partnership. Email AAP@unitedwayatlanta.org to learn more.