Belisa Urbina knew the well-being of her staff was her most important priority, but she had an important decision to make—she and her husband, Miguel, both.

The two founded the nonprofit Ser Familia in 2001 after moving from Puerto Rico to Georgia in 1999. In the nearly two decades since its inception, Ser Familia has become a leading program in Georgia that provides family services to the Latino communities of the Greater Atlanta region.

So, in March 2020 with the probable outbreak of the novel coronavirus on the horizon, Belisa says she reached out to her employees and board members for input.

“I remember that on a Sunday I sent a text to my board members and asked if they could meet with me via phone that afternoon,” Belisa says. “We went through every scenario—what if we closed the offices, we kept this one open, closed that one—we crunched the numbers and made plans from ABC up to Z.”

Belisa says Ser Familia ultimately made the decision to keep their offices open through the worst of the pandemic. She said it was important—too important—that the Latino community have a place to come “in the midst of a tremendous crisis,” and “be listened to and be supported.”

“We were blessed to be able to provide emergency assistance in the way we could do it,” she says. “We have provided the same services that we provided [before the pandemic], and on top of that, we are doing an emergency relief effort of really large proportions.”

Ser Familia aims to strengthen Latino families and equip Latino youth, couples, parents and families through programs that “teach improved life, leadership and communication skills,” and they offer social services to Latino families—for almost 20 years they have offered youth programs, case management, victim support services, mental health counseling, immigration legal relief efforts and other emergency services, Belisa says.

To this day, Belisa says Ser Familia has supplied more than $400K in emergency rental assistance.

And the demand has increased since the COVID-19 outbreak. Ser Familia was one of the most recent recipients of grant funds made possible through the Greater Atlanta COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund, a joint effort from United Way of Greater Atlanta and the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta.

On Aug. 11, United Way and Community Foundation announced the seventh round of grants for the COVID-19 response. Ser Familia received $150,000 to meet the increased demand for emergency financial assistance.

The seventh round of grants totaled roughly $1.13 million and targeted emergency financial assistance for housing-related costs. The grants went to 10 organizations in response to the region’s needs resulting from COVID-19.

The Latino community was one of the “first ones to be impacted,” Belisa says, after state and local officials made efforts to stem the spread of the coronavirus by shutting down small businesses, restaurants, gyms and schools.

As of Sept. 1, COVID-19, which is a respiratory illness with symptoms such as cough, fever and in severe cases, difficulty breathing, has infected more than 6 million nationwide and killed more than 183,000 people.

“The hospitality industry, construction, all of those where the Latino families work went out the door,” Belisa says. “From this point, there’s no recovery in sight.”

Belisa’s team did a survey around the second week of April to see just how great the impact in her community was. She said Ser Familia found that of the surveyed, about 65 percent had lost one or both sources of income in the home.

Ser Familia had pivoted to address the immediate needs of the community, Belisa says, which meant offering tutoring, addressing food insecurity, COVID-19 testing, etc.

She’s been thankful for her staff and their ability to step up during these times—often working long hours, weekends. With every challenge that COVID-19 brought, Belisa says her staff went “toe to toe with it.”

“Sometimes you think that you have the right people on [staff], but it’s times like these when you just know you have the right people,” Belisa says. “My staff has been here and have shown up every day, every time. They have gone beyond everything that I have imagined they would do. They have made every difference in the world.”

She was also extremely grateful for the grant funds provided by United Way and Community Foundation. Without this partnership and support, she says, “none of this would be possible.”

If you would like to help empower this work in communities across Greater Atlanta, donate to the Greater Atlanta COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund.

If you or someone you know lives within the city limits of Atlanta and are in need of emergency rental assistance, visit relief.uwga.org to see if you might be eligible for funds that could cover past due rent, utilities and move-in deposits as a result of impending eviction.

David was experiencing shortness of breath.

As an undocumented American, he was afraid to leave for the hospital and afraid to leave his family alone—so he called the Latino Community Fund of Georgia.

He was desperate, and he thought this could be one of the last phone calls he ever made. He needed it to count.

His eight family members, all undocumented, were living in an apartment together. David wanted to make sure his family was supported and taken care of in case he died.

A representative with the Latino Community Fund reached out to the Grady Health System for a health professional who specializes in assisting undocumented clients like David. Over the course of two conversations, the health professional encouraged David to seek treatment. David survived his bout with the coronavirus, but he had been left with an $81,000 bill.

Now, the Latino Community Fund is working with him to understand and negotiate his expenses and help as he and his family move on from this.

The Latino Community Fund was one of the most recent recipients of grant funds made possible through the Greater Atlanta COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund, a joint effort from United Way of Greater Atlanta and Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta.

On Aug. 11, United Way and Community Foundation announced the seventh round of grants for the COVID-19 response. Latino Community Fund received $200,000 to provide emergency financial assistance for Latinx communities throughout Greater Atlanta.

The seventh round of grants totaled roughly $1.13 million and targeted emergency financial assistance for housing-related costs. The grants went to 10 organizations in response to the region’s needs as a result of COVID-19.

About two weeks into March, major cities across the country began shutting down restaurants, bars, gyms and schools in an attempt to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. As of Aug. 13, COVID-19, which is a respiratory illness with symptoms such as cough, fever and in severe cases, difficulty breathing, has infected more than 5 million people nationwide and killed more than 165,000.

This seventh round of grant funding from United Way and Community Foundation allows organizations to provide emergency financial assistance in response to this crisis for a period of up to four and a half months.

Nine of the grants provided emergency financial assistance and legal support to combat evictions for some of our most vulnerable, low-income populations — undocumented and immigrant families with children, families who may face threats from domestic violence, families who live in extended stay motels and families without formal leases.

David’s employer has not hired him back, and he currently has no job to provide for his family. There are many other stories like his around Greater Atlanta.

To help those in need, donate to the Greater Atlanta COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund. If you would like to empower communities of color in Greater Atlanta impacted by decades of systemic barriers and disinvestment, donate to the United for Racial Equity and Healing Fund.

You can also ensure that all children in Greater Atlanta have access to the same resources and opportunities by donating to the Child Well-Being Impact Fund.

ATLANTA – August 11, 2020 – The Greater Atlanta COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund, a joint effort from Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta and United Way of Greater Atlanta, today announces the Fund’s seventh round of grants targeted to emergency financial assistance for housing-related costs. To date, the Fund has raised more than $25 million through collective resources. Since the Fund was announced in March, the two organizations have together identified the areas of greatest need and the most vulnerable populations to determine where to deliver funds.

This seventh round of grants total $1.125 million and will be distributed to 10 organizations in response to the region’s needs as a result of COVID-19. A grand total of more than $18.425 million from the Fund has been mobilized to benefit 321 nonprofits thus far. A full listing of today’s grants is detailed below. These, as well as those made in the earlier rounds, are listed on both the Community Foundation’s website and United Way’s website.

Individuals who wish to contribute to supporting our region’s nonprofits can donate to the COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund here. Support funds will be released on a rolling basis throughout the outbreak and recovery phases of the crisis.

The seventh round of grants will allow the grantee organizations to provide funding for emergency financial (rent and utilities) assistance in response to the COVID-19 crisis for a period of up to 4.5 months. Research indicated that each of the organizations has the ability to meet high demand for emergency financial assistance and strong track record of effectively serving the most vulnerable people in our region across a wide geographic scope. Nine of the grants will provide emergency financial assistance and legal support to combat evictions for some of our most vulnerable, low-income populations. These populations include undocumented and immigrant families with children, families who face threats from domestic violence, families who live in extended stay motels and families without formal leases.  The 10th grant will expand COVID-19 testing in low-income and high-risk communities.

According to the Aspen Institute, multiple studies have quantified the effect of COVID-19-related job loss and economic hardship on renters’ ability to pay rent during the pandemic. While methodologies differ, these analyses converge on a dire prediction: If conditions do not change, 29-45% of renter households in Georgia could be at risk of eviction by the end of the year.1

Steps for applying for the next round of grants will be released on September 1. In order to respond to the quickly shifting needs of our community, the Fund is committed to funding emergent needs through additional rounds of funding as well. Details will be posted here.

Today’s grant recipients and grant amounts are:

Georgia ACT (Advancing Communities Together) – $75,000 to provide emergency financial assistance and eviction relief in its multi-county service area.

Georgia Legal Services Program – $100,000 to support and meet the increased demand for emergency financial assistance, eviction filings and legal representation in the region.

Inspiritus (formerly Lutheran Services of Georgia) – $100,000 to meet the increased demand for emergency financial assistance in its multi-county service area.

Latin American Association – $150,000 to meet the increased demand for emergency financial assistance in its service area.

Latino Community Fund – $200,000 to provide emergency financial assistance for Latinx communities throughout Greater Atlanta in partnership with grassroots Latinx organizations.

St. Vincent DePaul Georgia – $100,000 to meet the increased demand for emergency financial assistance in the region.

Ser Familia – $150,000 to meet the increased demand for emergency financial assistance.

Single Parent Alliance and Resource Center (SPARC) – $100,000 to meet the increased demand for emergency financial assistance and rehousing services.

Star C – $100,000 to support emergency financial assistance, housing and eviction relief.

United 2 Live – $50,000 to provide increased testing and testing support services to meet the needs of hard to reach populations in low-income communities.

The Fund was announced March 17 with Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta committing $1 million and United Way of Greater Atlanta contributing $500,000 to seed the Fund. Significant contributions to the fund have come from organizations including the Coca-Cola Company, Robert W. Woodruff Foundation and the Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation, each donating $5 million to the Fund in support. Other current funders include the City of Atlanta, The Goizueta Foundation, The Klump Family Foundation and Truist Foundation, contributing $1 million each. A complete list of corporate, foundation and individual donors that gave $25,000 or more to the Fund can be found here.

Individuals and families impacted and in need of support can contact United Way of Greater Atlanta’s 2-1-1 Contact Center. Due to high call volumes, texting is the quickest way to get in touch with United Way 2-1-1. Text “211od” to 898-211 to get a list of resources by zip code. The 2-1-1 database is another quick way to find resources during this time of increased call volume. 2-1-1 is a valuable resource that is available 24-hours and 7 days-a-week.

The Community Foundation will continue to update details for donors and nonprofits through its blog and via social media via Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. To view updates from United Way of Greater Atlanta, click here or follow on FacebookLinkedIn and Twitter.

#  #  #

1https://www.aspeninstitute.org/blog-posts/the-covid-19-eviction-crisis-an-estimated-30-40-million-people-in-america-are-at-risk/

 

About United Way of Greater Atlanta

United Way of Greater Atlanta, the largest United Way chapter in the nation, focuses on ensuring that every child in Atlanta has the opportunity to reach his or her full potential. The organization invests in more than 200 programs in 13 counties through the Child Well-Being Impact Fund and works to help children succeed in school, improve financial stability of families, provide affordable and accessible healthcare and end homelessness. For more information, visit: unitedwayatlanta.org or Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram.

 

About the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta

Since 1951, the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta has been leading and inspiring philanthropy to increase the vitality of our region and the well-being of all residents. With nearly 70 years serving the 23-county Atlanta region and a robust team of experts, the Community Foundation expands its philanthropic reach and impact by providing quality services to donors and bold, innovative community leadership. The Community Foundation is a top-20 community foundation among 750 nationally, with approximately $1.2 billion in current assets, and is Georgia’s second largest foundation. For more information, visit: cfgreateratlanta.org or connect with the Foundation via Facebook LinkedIn and Twitter.

 

Rarely is toilet paper ever something you give much thought to—until you’re out of it, that is.

We are, as a country, facing an unprecedented crisis. The pandemic outbreak of the novel coronavirus has forced much of the world into an at least semi-quarantined state, and one of the most unlikely outcomes of that has been a nationwide shortage of toilet paper on the shelves at retail and grocery stores.

But one company has teamed up with United Way Worldwide to make sure there’s plenty to go around, and that there’s no shortness of kindness in this difficult time.

“Since all of this started, toilet paper has become top of mind for a lot of consumers, and as a national toilet paper brand, and one of the leading makers of toilet paper, we knew we were in a unique position to make a difference,” says Ken Champa, senior brand manager for Cottonelle, a product owned by Kimberly-Clark Corporation. “We sat down and thought about how we could make a difference and a partnership with United Way was a no-brainer as Kimberly-Clark and United Way have had a long-standing relationship for 65 years.”

So, this plan to help was three-fold—three-ply, if you will. Cottonelle was in a unique position to get these products into people’s hands.

They started with a donation on behalf of the brand of $1 million dollars to United Way Worldwide’s COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund, and the organization would put those funds to use all over the country addressing the health and economic crisis in communities.

The second element was a donation of 1 million rolls of toilet paper, and the third part was a promise to donate $1 for every example of toilet paper sharing posted to social media using the hashtag #ShareASquare, through June 1, up to $100,000.

“#ShareASquare has driven a lot of great engagement,” Champa says. “We’ve seen thousands of posts across the country and we are doing all we can to make as much of an impact as safely as we can. And in all of that work, we decided to make this donation- we knew this was the right thing to do so that we could maximize help for others.”

About two weeks into March, major cities across the country began shutting down restaurants, bars, gyms and schools in an attempt to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. As of May 12, the infectious disease, COVID-19, which is a respiratory illness with symptoms such as cough, fever and in severe cases, difficulty breathing, has infected more than 1.34 million people nationwide and killed more than 80,000. 

Businesses shut down in Atlanta and its surrounding communities, and Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms on March 24 issued a “stay-at-home” order.

Social distancing guidelines were encouraged at the federal, state and local levels. On Wednesday, April 8, Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp extended a statewide shelter-in-place order to roll on through the month of April, but he announced plans two weeks later to begin rolling back those orders to begin re-opening certain businesses previously deemed “nonessential.”

As Georgia began to feel the impact of this economic shutdown, local nonprofits were being called on for additional help, and when UWW set out to distribute the toilet paper rolls from Cottonelle, United Way of Greater Atlanta was one of the first set to receive the gift.

Cottonelle shared more than a square with Greater Atlanta, though. United Way of Greater Atlanta’s Gifts-In-Kind warehouse is set to receive more than 50,000 rolls to distribute to local nonprofits in the coming months.

“We have the room here for pallets and pallets of toilet paper,” says GIK Facility Manager Ann Daane says. “Everybody is asking for toilet paper, and these are critical, especially for a lot of families that aren’t financially secure—they are coping with having children at home and all of the issues for those families and economic issues, food security, housing and now tissue issues on top of that.”

Daane says the first truckload came in around 9 a.m. the week of April 1, and she expects more shipments in the coming weeks.

“This is a great way for Kimberly-Clark to make an impact on communities in ways that people will definitely appreciate,” Daane says.

Champa says the #ShareASquare campaign has shown just how much a gift like this can affect a person’s life.

“It’s been really cool to see real-life impact and families sharing with children, friends, neighbors and strangers,” he says.

If you would like to make a difference in the lives of those across Georgia who are feeling the impact of this economic and health crisis, donate today to the Greater Atlanta COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund and provide resources and supports for nonprofits across the Greater Atlanta region and state of Georgia.

Think of a child in the Fulton County School System. He’s in fourth grade, in a few years, he’ll be in middle school and before you know it, he’ll be walking across the stage with diploma in hand.

This little boy’s life hasn’t always been the easiest—his mother had difficulty keeping a full-time job until she started driving for Uber. They’ve both been living in motel rooms and temporary housing this year. Life is a struggle, but there’s enough to live on for now. Things are OK, and at least one thing has been a constant for this little boy through it all.

Each morning, he wakes up and goes to school. He may not have the same access to resources as his classmates or other children living in neighboring zip codes, but he gets the same opportunity for a quality education. This is his normal, the life he’s come to expect.

Life changed for this child on March 9, though, when it was announced a teacher in the Fulton County School System had confirmed they were infected with COVID-19. In the coming days, school systems were ordered to be closed by Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp, shelter-in-place orders were enforced by state and local officials and children across the state were forced to stay at home.

But that created a whole new set of problems. It has been hard to get in touch with families, not all children had access to computers or the internet, parents lost jobs or had hours cut back tremendously, access to groceries, transportation and housing needs were pushed to the forefront—there were mental health issues to address, as well.

“We’ve always had these needs,” says Chelsea Montgomery, executive director of Counseling, Psychological and Social Work Services for Fulton County Schools. “COVID urgently increased our need for basic resources, and money would be critical. It’s expensive to get families in hotels.”

“We did a good job of making school meals accessible, but transportation was a challenge. Now we’re starting to see a lot more need for housing and support for COVID-related trauma.”

There are currently more than 1,300 students in the Fulton County School System who are homeless, Montgomery says. Those students and their families are spread throughout the county and are not just limited to one region.

While issues like these have always been apparent in Fulton County, the pandemic outbreak of the novel coronavirus and the forced shutdown of many businesses across Greater Atlanta have only exacerbated these problems. As of May 11, the infectious disease, COVID-19, which is a respiratory illness with symptoms such as cough, fever and in severe cases, difficulty breathing, has infected more than 1.3 million and killed more than 78,000 people across the United States.

As schools shut down, Montgomery says her team of social workers began hearing from homeless children, foster families and other at-risk children of their specific needs. She said there wasn’t yet a way to fulfill them. They had to act quickly.

“The school Social Workers are in constant contact with families, and so are all of our Student Support Staff,” Montgomery says. “They have been checking in with families each week, and as those needs come up, the [School Social Workers] complete a request form, we have our internal reviewers take a look at those requests and we meet them.”

Montgomery was able to turn to Graham Huff with the Fulton Education Foundation to help provide funds and access for these families that needed it.

The Fulton Education Foundation was established to partner with the community to address the physical, emotional, academic and enrichment needs of all students. They have provided College and Career services, after-school programs, mental health services, early education opportunities and scholarships.

But this pandemic presented new challenges. Huff knew the need in Fulton County was great, and he leveraged previous relationships with contacts at United Way of Greater Atlanta and Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta to apply for money through the Greater Atlanta COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund.

The Fulton Education Foundation was awarded grants totaling $300,000 to contribute to the costs of housing, food, transportation and therapy for students presenting the greatest needs.

“We’ve placed 36 families so far, and we’ve helped them with some rent coverage,” Huff said May 11. “We’re also helping them with hygiene supplies and mental health services. We’ve put together a great committee, and we’re doing a great job for accountability.”

Huff, who has been the President and CEO of the Fulton Education Foundation for just “over a year,” said the foundation has looked at this as a “bottom-up approach,” working to provide homeless families a place to stay first, and then pre-loaded gift cards that can be used to purchase grocery items or to pay for transportation.

This was the first funding Huff had received from both United Way and Community Foundation, he says.

“We’ve really tried to implement best practices and set the standards for this type of support system,” Huff says. “We’ve been able to put more toward support of students this year than the previous 10 years combined—we’ve received large gifts even beyond this COVID-19 grant.”

Montgomery says her school system was “bombarded” with families in need once this pandemic struck.

“We were preparing, but it happened really quickly,” she says. “We didn’t have good, safe, quick solutions.

“But Graham came and said, ‘What are your challenges?’ I got with our lead team and said, ‘This is what we need.’”

These funds provided by United Way and Community Foundation gave Montgomery, her team and families in Fulton County one vitally important thing: hope.

That’s been invaluable during this time.

“It’s really nice for my staff to know that when we talk to these families, we have a solution,” Montgomery says. “Not only is it amazing for our families, but our morale has been better. It’s incredible to know there’s not a lot of red tape or rules and that we can just provide help, and fast. It’s exactly what our families needed.”

If you would like to help more children and families across Georgia, give to United Way of Greater Atlanta and Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta’s COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund.

ATLANTA – May 8, 2020 – The Greater Atlanta COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund, a joint effort from Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta and United Way of Greater Atlanta, today announces the Fund’s sixth round of grants. To date, the Fund has raised more than $25 million through collective resources. The two organizations have together identified the areas of greatest need and the most vulnerable populations to determine where to deliver funds.

This sixth round of grants total $5.3 million and will be distributed to 245 organizations in response to the region’s needs as a result of COVID-19. A grand total of more than $17.3 million from the Fund has been mobilized to benefit 320 nonprofits thus far. A full listing of today’s grants are detailed below. These, as well as those made in the earlier rounds, are listed on both the Community Foundation’s website and United Way’s website

Individuals who wish to contribute to supporting our region’s nonprofits can donate to the COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund here. Support funds will be released on a rolling basis throughout the outbreak and recovery phases of the crisis. 

During an open, public application process in April, more than 650 nonprofit organizations requested funding and today 245 are receiving grants. The grant review committee placed strong consideration on racial and gender equity in their decisions. Geographic spread and the ability to reach underserved communities and neighborhoods with vital support were also among the considerations.

Grant awards were also informed by a digital listening tool which captured input from more than 300 organizations. Multiple themes have emerged depicting nonprofit experiences: 

  • Increase in service requests and new clients requesting assistance
  • Loss of revenue, fees for service and donations
  • Loss of volunteer assistance due to shelter-in-place orders
  • Moving work and services to digital platforms such as telehealth, leading to added technology needs and training
  • Supply shortages for staff, clients and distribution (cleaning supplies, food, household paper products, personal protective equipment/PPE)

 

Grants are given to nonprofits for general operating support, allowing the receiving organization to direct funds to where they are most needed as they respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. Funding priority areas include childcare, education, emergency financial assistance, food security, health, housing and small business support. Prevailing needs in each of these areas are:

Childcare ($315,500 in total grants this round)

Many childcare centers have had to close, putting financial burdens on facility owners and creating fewer options for frontline healthcare professionals and first responders. Cost and accessibility to quality childcare were issues for families before COVID-19, exacerbated now by the pandemic. Funds help early childhood centers remain open with new safety standards and centers that are providing virtual learning opportunities and family supports. 

Education ($957,050 in total grants this round)

With schools closed, over 344,000 students in our region do not have access to the support needed for learning. Grants include educational support provisions and fill gaps in digital/online access, meals and mental health supports.

Emergency Financial Assistance ($990,000 in total grants this round)

The immediate loss of income for thousands of individuals and families has depleted or eliminated any savings for emergency needs, especially for hourly, service industry and gig workers. Grants will support an increased need for emergency financial assistance that ranges from rent and utility assistance to diapers, cleaning supplies and medications.

Food Security ($965,000 in total grants this round)

COVID-19 has disrupted the system of food access for hundreds of thousands of individuals and families, especially seniors, students and the homeless population. Grants for this area will address the exponential increase in demand for food at area pantries and food distribution sites and innovation in delivery options to replace volunteers that can’t be used for safety reasons.

Health ($918,575 in total grants this round)

The health safety net has experienced significant reductions in services. Most school-based clinics and some community-based centers have closed and others have faced lost revenue with declining patient volume. Charitable clinics are reporting increasing numbers due to people losing healthcare related to loss of jobs and not having other options for affordable care. Specific areas of need include access to care, behavioral health, chronic health specialty organizations, maternal and child care and services for people with disabilities.

Housing ($695,000 in total grants this round)

With unprecedented job loss and reduced hours, low-income renters are now challenged to afford their rent. There will be a growing number of unhoused and displaced persons, especially of low-income people of color and young adults. Grants for this area focus on legal support for people at risk of losing housing, basic needs to address housing stability and safety, providing stable housing for people experiencing homelessness and support for people living in residential facilities facing increased needs.

Small Business Support ($495,000 in total grants this round)

Many small business owners have not had access to Paycheck Protection Program loans from the federal government. It is estimated that up to 72% of small businesses will not survive if the crisis extends 4 months or longer. The largest grants are going to organizations that provide direct support for small business owners of color, which have historically had less access to capital, and are significantly less likely to obtain bank funds as white business owners. 

 

Today’s grant recipients are (individual grant amounts are available here): 

 

  1. 180 Your Grief, Inc. DBA Widow Strong – to cover costs for modified operations and increased demand for services. 
  2. 21st Century Leaders – to support an immersive leadership development experience.
  3. 3D Girls, Inc. – to support basic needs for babies and new mothers.
  4. Acceptance Recovery Center – to support emergency housing and emergency financial assistance to cover program fees.
  5. Agape Youth & Family Center – to provide emergency financial assistance for families experiencing loss of jobs, furloughs or reduced work hours.
  6. Agnes Scott College – for emergency financial assistance, technology supports and internet connectivity for students without access. 
  7. Anchor of Hope, Inc. – to provide basic needs and emergency financial assistance to immigrant families in service industries experiencing loss of jobs.
  8. Artportunity Knocks – to support an online academy focused on science, technology, engineering, art and math.
  9. Asian Americans Advancing Justice – to provide culturally-appropriate information, service provision and advocacy for immigrant populations with highly increased risks to health and safety.
  10. Atlanta Association For Convalescent Aged Persons Inc. dba Sadie G. Mays Health & Rehabilitation Center – to cover the increased costs for additional treatment equipment, cleaning supplies and PPE to continue serving high risk patients.
  11. Atlanta Birth Center – to provide increased services and support for pregnant mothers, partners and midwives at its center reducing the exposure risks for mothers, babies and their families.
  12. Atlanta Cancer Care Foundation, Inc. – to provide direct payment of bills or gift cards for food or gas.
  13. Atlanta CARES Mentoring Movement, LLC. – to provide laptops and increased case management for parents of children who’ve interacted with the juvenile justice system.
  14. Atlanta Fire Rescue Foundation, Inc. – to support the physical health, safety and mental health needs of the 1,100 firefighters serving the city of Atlanta.
  15. Atlanta GLOW (Fiscal Agent – Women’s Nonprofit Alliance) – to provide emergency financial assistance for food, medicine and other basic needs.
  16. Atlanta Harm Reduction Coalition, Inc – to cover the costs of virtual case management, grocery cards for 40 families and meal distribution for 160 people monthly.
  17. Atlanta Legal Aid Society, Inc. – to support costs of continued advocacy on behalf of its clients in danger of losing housing due to COVID-19. 
  18. The Atlanta Masjid of Al-Islam – to cover costs of delivering weekly halal meals to 500 seniors in East Atlanta.
  19. Atlanta Mission – to address needs of people being sheltered at the Mission.
  20. Atlanta Neighborhood Development Partnership – to cover costs that address housing needs, basic needs and information on COVID-19. 
  21. ATLFAMILYMEAL, Inc. – to cover the costs of repurposing restaurant industry resources to feed and support industry workers.
  22. Auditory-Verbal Center, Inc. – to provide teletherapy for low-income infants, children, adults and their families with auditory and verbal disabilities due to hearing loss.
  23. Bald Ridge Lodge, Inc. – to provide for increased staffing, supplies and services for the residents of Bald Ridge Lodge.
  24. Bearings Bike Shop – to cover costs of new food delivery services for its clients.
  25. Behavioral Health of Georgia (Fiscal Agent – View Point Health) – to provide shelter for patients requiring self-quarantine and establishing telehealth services for current and new clients.
  26. BEN HILL UMC, INC – for emergency financial assistance, food and childcare support.
  27. Bethany Christian Services of Georgia – to support emergency basic needs for children in foster care.
  28. Bethesda Community Clinic – to support telehealth service provision and COVID-19 testing.
  29. Black Alliance for Just Immigration – to provide emergency financial assistance, communications technology and language services for Black immigrants.
  30. Black Child Development Institute – to provide virtual programming to support parents of young children, childcare providers and elementary educators.
  31. Bobby Dodd Institute – to provide equipment and materials for connectivity and telehealth support to prevent isolationism amongst their clients.
  32. The Boyce L. Ansley School – for tablets, learning packets, food, transportation and virtual support for homeless students and their families.
  33. Boys & Girls Clubs of Metro Atlanta – for family support, virtual programming for youth, laptops and food.
  34. Boys & Girls Clubs of North Central Georgia – to provide virtual programming like STEM, outdoor, reading and craft activities and to provide learning kits.
  35. Boys & Girls Clubs of North Georgia – for virtual programming and learning kits.
  36. Bread of Life Development Ministries, Inc. – to continue providing food to children 18 years and younger, and adults with disabilities.
  37. Breakthrough Atlanta (Fiscal agent – The Lovett School)- to provide virtual summer programming, weekly meal boxes and case management.
  38. Bright Futures Atlanta – in response to the transition to online programming, providing laptops and internet access, food and emergency services.
  39. Brown Toy Box (Fiscal Agent – Science Atl, Inc.) – to provide grade level science, engineering, art and math kits and digital content. 
  40. Buckhead Christian Ministry – to provide emergency financial assistance.
  41. Butts County Life Enrichment Team – to provide books and food for families.
  42. C4 Atlanta Inc. – to provide emergency financial assistance for artists.
  43. Caminar Latino, Inc. – to provide an array of services and support to families facing increased stress and violence due to COVID-19.
  44. Captain Planet Foundation – to cover costs of planting urban gardens in Atlanta area schools.
  45. CaringWorks, Inc. – to continue providing supportive housing to more than 1,000 individuals and families experiencing physical health conditions that increase their risks of contracting and succumbing to COVID-19.
  46. Carrie Steele Pitts Home – for increased costs associated with providing housing and support for youth who are in foster care or have aged out.
  47. CAYA Reconciliation Ministries – to cover costs for modified operations and increased demand for services.
  48. Center for Black Women’s Wellness – to cover the costs of extending existing patient care plans, providing additional therapeutic supports, establishing a telehealth system (equipment purchase, training, outreach, etc.) and providing infant and mother care kits.
  49. The Center for Children & Young Adults – for increased staffing to meet the needs of homeless youth.
  50. Center for Civic Innovation – to provide emergency financial assistance, coaching, strategic guidance and resource connections for entrepreneurs.
  51. Central Outreach and Advocacy Center – for transportation, identification needs and referrals to food.
  52. Cherokee Family Violence Center, Inc. – to provide emergency shelter to victims of domestic violence.
  53. City of Refuge, Inc. – to continue providing a broad range of support for vulnerable residents of Atlanta’s Westside neighborhoods.
  54. Clarkston Community Center Foundation, Inc. – to cover costs of providing food to seniors and increased pantry hours.
  55. Clarkston Development Foundation – CDF Action, Inc. – for continued support to the refugee community for early learning and census completion in a priority community.
  56. Closer Look Ministries, Inc. – for subsidized childcare for essential workers, learning materials for children at home and to provide meals.
  57. Cobb Community Foundation, Inc. – to support the Cobb COVID-19 Community Response Fund.
  58. Cobbs School Foundation – for technology devices and development to address remediation needs for instruction. 
  59. College AIM, Inc. – to provide virtual support for college and financial aid counseling, tutoring, career coaches and emergency needs.
  60. College Park Main Street Association Inc. – to provide bridge funding for small businesses in south Fulton.
  61. Communities In Schools of Georgia in Marietta/Cobb County – to provide technology supports and emergency assistance.
  62. Community Action for Improvement – for emergency financial assistance.
  63. Community Advanced Practice Nurses, Inc. – to provide for increased safety for staff and patients, deep cleaning of the facility and COVID-19 testing.
  64. Community Farmers Markets Inc (CFM) –  to cover costs of virtual farmers’ markets and matching benefits of SNAP/EBT with eligible customers.
  65. Community Foundation for Northeast Georgia – to support their localized Coronavirus Relief Fund.
  66. Community Friendship, Inc. – for shelter, emergency financial assistance and food for people experiencing homelessness.
  67. Community Guilds Inc. – for science, technology, engineering, art and math kits for youth.
  68. Community Movement Builders – to cover costs for modified operations and increased demand for services.
  69. Community Outreach in Action, Inc. – to cover costs for modified operations and increased demand for services in Clayton, Fayette, Fulton and Henry counties.
  70. Concrete Jungle – to cover costs for modified operations and increased demand for services.
  71. Connecting Henry, Inc. – for food and emergency financial assistance.
  72. Cool Girls, Inc. – to provide emergency financial assistance for families.
  73. Covenant House Georgia, Inc. – for increased on-site programming due to the shelter in place order and social distancing guidelines.
  74. Coweta Samaritan Clinic – to cover the costs of modifying programs and providing additional services and support to patients with chronic medical conditions.
  75. Create Your Dreams – to provide emergency financial assistance for families experiencing unemployment.
  76. Crossroads Community Ministries – to continue providing services to people experiencing homelessness. 
  77. CURE Childhood Cancer – for emergency financial assistance to families for housing costs.
  78. The Davis Direction Foundation – to cover costs of its new food delivery services and other services for people experiencing homelessness.
  79. Decatur Area Emergency Assistance Ministry – for emergency financial assistance.
  80. DeKalb County School District (Fiscal Agent – Georgia United Foundation) – to support online instruction through technology devices.
  81. DeKalb Library Foundation – for hotspot access, virtual story time and education programs.
  82. Diabetes Association of Atlanta – to increase access to effective healthcare and resources for people with increased risks related to COVID-19.
  83. Duluth Cooperative Ministries – to cover increases of up to 18-times their normal service levels.
  84. East Atlanta Kids Club, Inc. – to cover costs for modified operations and increased demand for services.
  85. East Lake Foundation, Inc. – to provide emergency financial assistance, food and childcare.
  86. The Edge Connection – for education, coaching and mentoring for business owners and entrepreneurs.
  87. ELEVATE Coweta Students – for food distribution and resource referral services in response to COVID-19.
  88. Emmaus House – to provide emergency financial assistance.
  89. Essential2Life, Inc. – for online learning devices for tutoring and mentoring services.
  90. Ethne Health – to provide low-cost and no-cost COVID-19 testing, and culturally appropriate information to refugees in Clarkston.
  91. Families First – for additional service provision for increased numbers of seniors and low-income residents of Atlanta’s Westside neighborhoods.
  92. Family Patterns Matter – for food for families without transportation, virtual tutoring and mental health resources.
  93. Family Promise of Hall County – to provide emergency financial assistance, food and diapers to families.
  94. Family Support Circle – to cover costs of a new food delivery service for their clients. 
  95. Fayette County Council on Domestic Violence DBA Promise Place – to provide emergency shelter, a 24-hour emergency hotline, legal advocacy, weekly support groups, relocation and financial assistance, crisis counseling and safety planning for women and children escaping domestic violence.
  96. Fill Ministries Inc. DBA Meals by Grace – to cover costs of increased food purchases and distribution to more clients in Forsyth county. 
  97. Food Well Alliance Inc. – to cover the costs of modified operations in response to COVID-19.
  98. Fore Hadley Foundation – to provide emergency financial assistance for families with a child in a neonatal ICU.
  99. Forever Fed, Inc – to cover costs of increased food purchases and distribution to more clients in Cherokee county.
  100. Foundation of Wesley Woods – to provide grocery gift cards to vulnerable residents of two South Atlanta HUD communities.
  101. Frazer Center – for learning support for families with children with disabilities.
  102. Friends of Disabled Adults and Children (FODAC) – to help FODAC to continue to provide medical equipment and supplies to area hospitals and clinics during the crisis.
  103. Friends of Gwinnett Seniors, Inc. – to cover costs of the food delivery service to seniors.
  104. Fugees Family, Inc. – to support refugee students and their families with academic instruction, food and public health information translated in several languages.
  105. Furniture Bank Metro Atlanta – to purchase beds for low-income, new residents of homes in the region.
  106. Future Foundation – to provide virtual student learning, tutoring, technology devices, internet connectivity and access to food.
  107. Georgia Advancing Communities Together, Inc. – to provide direct rental/mortgage assistance to residents with priority given to those living in unsubsidized units and homeless persons.
  108. Georgia Asylum and Immigration Network (GAIN) – for emergency financial assistance for families receiving legal assistance.
  109. Georgia Care Connection Office, Inc. DBA Georgia Cares – to cover costs for modified operations and increased demand for services.
  110. Georgia Center for Nonprofits – for technical assistance provided to  nonprofits.
  111. Georgia Charitable Care Network Inc. – to provide telehealth support for up to 26 metro-Atlanta area charitable clinics.
  112. Georgia Highlands Medical Services – to provide drive-thru medical screenings and services at all of its sites.
  113. Georgia Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Business Development Center, Inc. – for technical and financial assistance for small businesses. 
  114. Georgia Hope Inc – to continue providing and securing homes for children and youth in foster care.
  115. Georgia Legal Services Program, Inc. – for increased need in legal services for tenants in danger of eviction due to the crisis.
  116. Georgia Organics – to help with efforts to connect organic farmers to means of filling gaps in food distribution.
  117. Gigi’s House, Inc – to cover the increased costs for food for the residents of the shelter.
  118. Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta –  for virtual programming for members and non-members focused on STEM, entrepreneurship, life skills and the outdoors.
  119. The Global Village Project, Inc. – for technology kits, food and emergency assistance.
  120. Good News at Noon – to cover costs of modified operations due to COVID-19 in Barrow, DeKalb, Forsyth, Gwinnett and Hall counties.
  121. Good News Clinics, Inc. – to cover costs of increased telehealth services, PPE for in-person treatment and screenings and curbside prescription services for residents of Hall County.
  122. Good Samaritan Health Center of Cobb, Inc. – for costs related to COVID-19 testing and triage, PPE and lab supplies, telehealth and COVID-HVAC upgrades.
  123. Good Samaritan Health Center of Gwinnett – for provision of COVID-19 screening and referral for testing and provision of emergency dental services for residents in its service area.
  124. Great Promise Partnership – for emergency financial assistance for students who have lost employment.
  125. The Greater Piney Grove Community Development, Inc. – to cover costs of modified operations due to COVID-19.
  126. Greening Youth Foundation, Inc. – for youth stipends and technology resources to support employment continuity.
  127. Grove Park Foundation Inc. – for emergency financial assistance for families to maintain stability in housing.
  128. Gwinnett Coalition for Health and Human Services – to cover costs of providing leadership to a local coalition and providing direct services to residents of Gwinnett county.
  129. Gwinnett Housing Corporation (DBA: Lawrenceville Housing Authority) – to provide food, financial assistance and preserving housing for 40 renters, 40 residents of extended stay shelters and 40 homeowners for the next 90 days.
  130. Hands of Hope Clinic – to continue providing in-person care and to establish telehealth services in Henry county.
  131. Hands On Atlanta, Inc. – to assist with Atlanta Public Schools food distribution activities.  
  132. Harvest Rain Early Learning Academy, Inc. – for scholarship and tuition assistance for childcare, online resources for children at home and grocery store gift cards for families.
  133. Haven of Light International, Inc. – to expand its technology-based connection services with its clientele, and increase its food support for women who have recently escaped domestic violence. 
  134. HEAL; or HEALing Community Center – to cover the costs of establishing telehealth services for primary care and behavioral health; and provide on-site COVID-19 testing.
  135. Helping Hands Computers Outreach, Inc. DBA Helping Hands Outreach – for its increased telemedicine system for low-income children and families in Rockdale county.
  136. Helping In His Name Ministries, Inc. – to support drive-thru services for food distribution efforts.
  137. The Herman J Russell Center for Innovation & Entrepreneurship – for small business supports.
  138. Hi-Hope Service Center – for continued services and staffing of its programming for people experiencing homelessness.
  139. Hispanic Alliance GA – to cover modifications in service provision in Hall county due to COVID-19.
  140. Hope for Youth, Inc. – for online curriculum and tech resources.
  141. Hope thru Soap, Inc. – to continue providing services to people experiencing homelessness.
  142. Horizons Atlanta – to cover the costs of providing meals to 850 students per day.
  143. House of Cherith, Inc. – to continue providing housing and wrap around supports to victims and survivors of human trafficking.
  144. Initiative for Affordable Housing, Inc. – to provide housing and ancillary social services for homeless families in DeKalb county.
  145. International Community School – to provide basic needs for children and families.
  146. Just Bakery of Atlanta – for employment support for business operations.
  147. Latin American Association – emergency financial and employment assistance for Latinx individuals and families.
  148. Leap Year – to support second graders with reading challenges and at-risk graduating high school seniors.
  149. Lilburn Cooperative Ministry, Inc. – to cover the costs of a 5-fold increase in the number of families being served weekly.
  150. liveSAFE Resources, Inc. – to continue providing shelter for the unhoused and a safe environment for its staff and clients. 
  151. Local Initiatives Support Corporation – for a small business grant and loan fund.
  152. Los Niños Primero, Inc. – for emergency financial assistance for immigrant families.
  153. Loving Arms Cancer Outreach (LACO) – to provide emergency financial assistance for patients with cancer.
  154. Lutheran Church of the Redeemer – to provide food and accurate COVID-19 related information to seniors, people experiencing homelessness.
  155. Making A Way Housing – to provide safe and affordable housing for people with compromised immune systems and therefore higher risks  for contracting COVID-19.
  156. Martin Luther King Jr. Center For Nonviolent Social Change Inc. – to support the King Center’s provision of services and information to the African American community.
  157. Mending The Gap Inc – to cover costs of the food delivery service to seniors in Gwinnett county.
  158. Mercy Housing Southeast – for restocking food and supply pantries, deep cleaning of properties, and staff support.
  159. Metamorphasis Powerhouse Company, Inc. – for virtual learning for students, career development services and technology support for older adults.
  160. Metro Atlanta Urban Farm – for work to support farmers in metro Atlanta.
  161. Midtown Assistance Center (MAC) – for emergency financial assistance.
  162. Miles for Cystic Fibrosis – to provide emergency financial assistance for families with a family member who has cystic fibrosis.
  163. Mosaic Georgia – to provide specialized services and support to increasing numbers of victims and survivors of intimate partner violence and abuse.
  164. Motivation Forward Inc. – to cover the costs of modified operations in response to COVID-19.
  165. Multi-Agency Alliance for Children, Inc. – to provide emergency financial assistance for youth and families in foster care. 
  166. My Fellow Man – for emergency financial assistance and food. 
  167. NAACP Atlanta Branch – to cover the costs of providing basic services and accurate information to residents of South Fulton county. 
  168. Neighbor in Need, Inc. – to cover costs of the food delivery service to seniors in East Lake, Kirkwood and Edgewood.
  169. New American Pathways – for emergency financial assistance, language services and case management.
  170. New Life Community Ministries – to provide food boxes to residents of South DeKalb county.
  171. Next Generation Focus, Inc. – to provide access to technology, tutoring and mentoring.
  172. Nobis Works, Inc. DBA Tommy Nobis Center – to provide case management, counseling, educational resources and COVID-19 information.
  173. Noonday Association – to cover costs of the food delivery service to seniors in Cherokee, Cobb and Paulding counties.
  174. Noor Family Services Corporation – for emergency financial assistance, food and transportation.
  175. North Georgia Community Action, Inc. – to provide housing support (rent payments, mortgage assistance and housing subsidies) for the next 90 days.
  176. North Gwinnett Co-Op – to cover increased costs due to increase in food delivery and emergency provisions.
  177. Nothing but the Truth – to cover costs of increased food purchases and distribution to more clients.
  178. The nsoro Educational Foundation, Inc. – to provide wraparound supports for students who came of age in the foster care system.
  179. Odyssey Inc. – for revised virtual summer programming, a tutoring platform and online learning classes.
  180. Odyssey Family Counseling Center – to provide virtual behavioral health and comprehensive mental health counseling for young people, families and people with intellectual and physical disabilities.
  181. One Roof Ecumenical Alliance Outreach – for emergency financial assistance for food and basic needs.
  182. One Talent, Inc. – for virtual programming, food and care packages.
  183. Operation First Response, Inc. – to provide emergency financial assistance to active duty service members, disabled veterans, first responders and their families.
  184. Operation HOPE – to provide emergency financial support and coaching for low-income populations facing job loss, business interruption and loan deferments. 
  185. Our House – to provide emergency shelter and assistance.
  186. Overcomers House Incorporated – to cover costs for modified operations and increased demand for services.
  187. The Place of Forsyth County – for emergency financial assistance.
  188. The Path Project, Inc. – to provide books and laptops for students. 
  189. PEACE Atlanta, Inc. – to provide PPE and cleaning supplies for residents.
  190. Positive Impact Health Centers – to provide for the increasing basic service needs of patients with HIV.
  191. The Posse Foundation – for virtual pre-collegiate training workshops, emergency support and assistance for both pre-college and college scholars.
  192. Premier Academy, Inc. – for essential needs for families and virtual engagement opportunities for children at home.
  193. Prevention Plus Inc. dba The Bridge Academy – to provide tutoring, emotional support, access to technology and food.
  194. Project Community Connections, Inc. – for emergency financial assistance to maintain housing after job losses.
  195. Project South –  to support food distribution and other services for residents of South Atlanta neighborhoods.
  196. Quest Community Development Corporation – for housing and financial services.
  197. Rainbow House, Inc. – for housing food, health care, counseling and educational support services for youth 24 hours/day 7 days/week.
  198. Raising Expectations – for digital learning supports, emergency financial assistance and access to food.
  199. Raksha Inc. – for emergency financial assistance.
  200. re:imagine/ATL – for emergency assistance, workforce training, mentoring, social-emotional supports, and technology equipment for vulnerable youth and their families.
  201. REAL School Gardens (dba Out Teach) – to support online learning resources for students, families and teachers as well as learning kits being sent home to students to support ongoing engagement in learning.
  202. Red Door Food Pantry – to cover costs for increased services to Bartow county residents.
  203. Reflections of Trinity – to cover the costs of a 25% increase in its food distribution in Cobb, Douglas and Paulding counties due to COVID-19.
  204. Refuge Coffee Co. – for business operation costs. 
  205. Refugee Village Corp –  for academic and technology support for students, food, cleaning supplies and COVID-19 information.
  206. RiverLife – to cover costs of its new food delivery services and other services for seniors and people with disabilities. 
  207. Rockdale Coalition for Children & Families – to cover the cost of modified food delivery activities due to COVID-19.
  208. Royal Adult Day Services, Inc. – to cover costs of modified operations due to COVID-19 and to continue support for individuals with dementia and their families.
  209. S.H.A.R.E. House, Inc. – to cover the costs for providing shelter, case management, meals, financial assistance and coordination of community resources for people who are homeless.
  210. SafeHouse Outreach Inc. – to provide meals for people relying on shelters for housing during the crisis.
  211. The Salvation Army of Gainesville – for increases in provision of its core services in the region. 
  212. The Scholarship Academy – for the virtual scholarship center, counseling, emergency aid and technology access.
  213. Scottdale Early Learning – for increased support for families.
  214. Second Helpings Atlanta – to cover modifications in operations and increased service requests.
  215. Serv International – to support food distribution efforts in Canton.
  216. Showcase Group – to provide telehealth and reentry services for incarcerated youth, recently released young people and their families.
  217. Sickle Cell Foundation of Georgia, Inc. – to cover the costs of modifying its service provision for people with sickle cell disease throughout the region.
  218. Sisu of Georgia Inc – for telehealth therapy services.
  219. Soldiers’ Angels – to  provide services to vulnerable veterans in the region.
  220. Southeast Gwinnett Cooperative Ministry – to cover costs of uptick in food provisions for new clients who reside in SW Gwinnett county.
  221. SPARK Reproductive Justice Now!, Inc. – to provide accurate medical information, referrals to safe support and treatment resources, and feminine hygiene and personal products for LGBTQIA+ communities of color in metro Atlanta.
  222. Special Needs Respite, Inc. – for respite care for families with children with special needs.
  223. Star-C Programs –  to support efforts to negotiate rent forgiveness and reduction due to the economic impacts of COVID-19.
  224. Street Grace – to provide emergency financial assistance for survivors of child sex trafficking.
  225. The Study Hall, Inc – to cover costs of modified operations due to COVID-19.
  226. Sustainable Norcross Inc. – to cover costs of modified operations due to COVID-19. 
  227. Tahirih Justice Center, Atlanta – to provide emergency financial support to immigrant survivors of gender-based violence.
  228. Tallatoona Community Action Partnership, Inc. – to provide emergency financial assistance.
  229. Tapestri, Inc. – to provide emergency financial assistance to refugee and immigrant survivors of domesic violence and human trafficking.
  230. Teach “O” Rea Preparatory Preschool – for family outreach including home learning materials and food.
  231. Technical College System of Georgia Foundation – for emergency needs and for digital devices to engage in distance learning.
  232. Together Friends Organization Inc. – for a virtual summer experience focused on math and science.
  233. Treasure House, Inc. – to provide emergency financial assistance, childcare, housing support and food assistance to families with children.
  234. Tri_Cities Arts Alliance, Inc. –  to provide emergency financial assistance for artists.
  235. Truancy Intervention Project Georgia, Inc. – for vulnerable students in need of specialized assistance based on school social workers and emergency financial assistance.
  236. Urban League of Greater Atlanta (ULGA) – to provide emergency financial assistance for basic needs, health and housing.
  237. Urban Recipe – to cover costs of its new food delivery services and extended pantry hours.
  238. Usher’s New Look –  for a virtual learning academy and emergency financial assistance.
  239. Visiting Nurse – to cover the costs of increased numbers of appointments (travel costs, PPE, treatment supplies, etc.) for elderly residents of metro Atlanta.
  240. Westside Future Fund – to provide emergency financial assistance, food and basic needs.
  241. Wholesome Wave Georgia – to cover costs of its COVID-19 SNAP outreach for restaurant and hospitality workers.
  242. Will2Way Foundation Inc – to continue providing services to people experiencing homelessness.
  243. Young Life East Atlanta (GA162) – to provide food and financial assistance for 30 new mothers.
  244. Youth Empowerment Success Services – to provide housing and case management support to displaced and homeless youth ages 18 – 24.
  245. Youth Empowerment through Learning, Leading, and Serving, Inc. (YELLS) – to provide emergency financial assistance.

The Fund was announced March 17 with Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta committing $1 million and United Way of Greater Atlanta contributing $500,000 to seed the Fund. As of today, more than $20 million in commitments have been secured from organizations including the Coca-Cola Company, Robert W. Woodruff Foundation, and the Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation, each donating $5 million to the Fund in support. Other current funders include the City of Atlanta, The Goizueta Foundation, The Klump Family Foundation and Truist Foundation, contributing $1 million each. A complete list of corporate, foundation and individual donors that gave $25,000 or more to the Fund can be found here.  

Individuals and families impacted and in need of support can contact United Way of Greater Atlanta’s 2-1-1 Contact Center. Due to high call volumes, texting is the quickest way to get in touch with United Way 2-1-1. Text 211od to 898-211 to get a list of resources by zip code. The 2-1-1 database is another quick way to find resources during this time of increased call volume. 2-1-1 is a valuable resource that is available 24-hours and 7 days-a-week.

The Community Foundation will continue to update details for donors and nonprofits through its blog and via social media via Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. To view updates from United Way of Greater Atlanta, click here or follow on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.

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About the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta

Since 1951, the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta has been leading and inspiring philanthropy to increase the vitality of our region and the well-being of all residents. With nearly 70 years serving the 23-county Atlanta region and a robust team of experts, the Community Foundation expands its philanthropic reach and impact by providing quality services to donors and bold, innovative community leadership. The Community Foundation is a top-20 community foundation among 750 nationally, with approximately $1.2 billion in current assets, and is Georgia’s second largest foundation. For more information, visit: cfgreateratlanta.org or connect with the Foundation via Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn and Twitter.

 

About United Way of Greater Atlanta

United Way of Greater Atlanta, the largest United Way chapter in the nation, focuses on ensuring that every child in Atlanta has the opportunity to reach his or her full potential. The organization invests in more than 200 programs in 13 counties through the Child Well-Being Impact Fund and works to help children succeed in school, improve financial stability of families, provide affordable and accessible healthcare and end homelessness. For more information, visit: unitedwayatlanta.org or Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram.

 

Media Contacts:

For United Way United Way of Greater Atlanta

Chad Parker, 404.358.5055

cparker@unitedwayatlanta.org

ATLANTA – April 21, 2020 – The Greater Atlanta COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund, a joint effort from Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta and United Way of Greater Atlanta, today announced the Fund’s fifth round of grants. A total of $1.463 million will be distributed to 13 organizations for emergency response. A grand total of nearly $12 million from the Fund has been mobilized to benefit 75 nonprofits to date. Grants made in the earlier rounds are detailed on both the Community Foundation’s website and United Way’s website

Today’s grant recipients from the fifth round and their grant amounts, are: 

 

  • Atlanta Technical College Foundation ($100,000) Due to COVID-19, many Pell-eligible students need housing assistance, food, personal care products and other basic needs. Almost 70 percent of Atlanta Technical College (ATC) students are economically disadvantaged and receive some form of financial aid. Students are mostly female, many of whom work and are raising children. Since closing in-person instruction due to COVID-19, ATC has seen a rise in student need in technology supports, emergency financial assistance and online tutorial services. ATC has created a Students’ Technology Support Fund and a Students’ Emergency Assistance Fund and expanded its online tutorial services. This grant will support the added costs related to providing added supports for students.

 

  • Clayton County Public Schools Foundation ($125,000) Clayton County Public Schools Foundation (Foundation) supports 55,000 Pre-K through 12th grade students and their families in the Clayton County school system. During this critical time the Foundation has provided meals, identified students who have educational needs and ensured that support for students with special needs continues. The Foundation has identified 1,750 students who do not have access to a laptop for online learning and are only completing assignments on a cell phone when it is available. This grant will support the purchase of Chromebooks that can be paired with Wi-Fi devices being provided to Clayton County students by 100 Black Men of America.

 

  • Georgia Gwinnett College Foundation($25,000) More than 60-percent of Georgia Gwinnett College (GGC) students are Pell-eligible. Due to COVID-19, many students need housing assistance, food, personal care products and other basic needs. GGC has established a Student Emergency Fund to support students whose education might be derailed due to the pandemic. The Fund is addressing student needs for food, gasoline, housing, rent and utilities, essential items that students need to keep them functional and enrolled. This grant will contribute to the emergency fund to meet essential student needs. 

 

  • Georgia Public Broadcasting (GPB Education) ($50,000) Within a week of the first school closures in March, GPB Education began providing expanded free services and resources to educators, students and families. They partnered with the Georgia Department of Education to launch Georgia Home Classroom, which includes a library of digital learning resources that adhere to the state’s standards for fostering at-home learning across all subjects and grade levels. GPB Education is also providing a daily e-newsletter to 50,000+ subscribers with recommendations on learning activities and opportunities, and weekly live webinars offering instructional strategies for remote learning. This grant will support extended services beyond the academic year and will provide educational support for families without technology and/or internet access and help mitigate what potentially may be a five-month learning loss for students who don’t have access to educational content.

 

  • Georgia State University Foundation ($100,000) Georgia State University (GSU) has established an Emergency Assistance Fund to provide aid to students who need immediate resources and support during the pandemic. GSU serves a particularly vulnerable population of students – nearly 60 percent are Pell-eligible with a median family income under $27,000. GSU has a streamlined, rapid response system in place where they can verify, document and award emergency funds to students in need within 24-48 hours. This grant will support GSU’s emergency funds that can be deployed to students immediately to alleviate housing and food insecurity and help fill in the gaps for other basic emergency needs. Awards to date have ranged from $250 to $1,000.

 

  • Gwinnett County Public Schools Foundation ($200,000) Gwinnett County Public Schools (GCPS) has been continuing students’ education by providing Digital Learning Days for students to receive daily assignments and connect with each of their teachers using the established learning management system, called eClass. About 10 percent of students (18,000 students) have not yet logged into their eClass page to view assignments, communication and resources provided by their teachers, largely due to lack of internet access. This grant will enable GCPS to purchase hot spots and internet service plans for families in need and to provide ‘Play 2 Learn’ packets with books and activities for parents of children under age 5 who would normally be served in childcare centers.  

 

  • Innovative Solutions for Disadvantage and Disability ($50,000) Innovative Solutions for Disadvantage and Disability (ISDD) provides support including case management, support groups, training and in-home tutoring to low-income, senior-headed households that include children with special needs. The average age of ISDD’s caregivers is 60, and many have an underlying health condition, such as diabetes or hypertension, which puts them at particular risk during the COVID-19 pandemic. This population is usually overlooked by existing systems. This grant will help ISDD provide food to these families and support their other needs, such as laptops for children to participate in school.  

 

  • KIPP Metro Atlanta Schools ($100,000) KIPP Metro Atlanta Schools is a network of 10 tuition-free, public charter schools that offer college-preparatory education in Atlanta’s educationally underserved communities, serving 4,600 students and 800 alumni in college. KIPP Metro Atlanta is not receiving COVID-19 emergency supports through the Georgia Charter Schools Association, Atlanta Public Schools or Fulton County Schools. Due to COVID-19, KIPP students need access to laptops and the internet for successful long-term distance learning. This grant will help provide students access to laptops, IT support and internet access, distance learning transitioning supplies and curriculum and emergency funding for families of students and alumni.

 

  • Marietta City Schools ($75,000) Marietta City Schools’ (MCS) response to students’ basic needs initially focused on feeding the thousands of children who depend on school for meals. Sixty percent of MCS students qualify for free/reduced lunch. The school system served more than 65,000 meals March 16 through April 3. Another immediate need is to keep students connected to learning, many of whom do not have Wi-Fi or devices needed for distance learning. MCS has purchased six months of Wi-Fi connectivity and has loaned 3,000 computers to ensure students can stay connected to learning during the closure. This grant will contribute to the $150,000 cost of connectivity for approximately 700 students who currently don’t have access. 

 

  • Partners for HOME ($300,000) Through their proven track record and partnership with the City of Atlanta, Partners for HOME (PfH) was able to leverage a $1.5 million pledge from the City for their COVID-19 response and action plan to address and assist people experiencing homelessness during this pandemic. PfH seeks to stop the spread of COVID-19 among shelter populations and house the most vulnerable: those over the age of 55 and those with underlying health conditions. PfH is coordinating with government and nonprofit organizations to provide 250 people with shelter, meals and healthcare for three months. This grant will support this effort that includes isolation beds, comprehensive testing and permanent supportive housing.

 

  • Partnership for Southern Equity ($150,000) Partnership for Southern Equity (PSE) works to advance policies and institutional actions that promote racial equity and shared prosperity for all. In response to COVID-19, PSE is re-granting funds to primarily African American-led organizations to provide emergency financial assistance to residents facing food insecurity, unstable housing and precarious physical and mental challenges. High rates of chronic diseases and increased risks of exposure because of work requirements, transportation and housing options combine for devastating effects: while 43% of Fulton County residents are African American, African Americans represent 85% of COVID-19 related deaths in Fulton County. This grant will assist PSE and its partners serving approximately 900 residents in the Pittsburgh and Peoplestown neighborhoods in Atlanta and several neighborhoods in South Fulton county.

 

  • Quality Care for Children ($150,000) Quality Care for Children (QCC) serves more than 100,000 children annually through the direct support of childcare providers, both center-based and family childcare. Without assistance during the COVID-19 crisis, many providers will close their doors, never to reopen. QCC is also focused on helping connect essential workers to childcare options and giving childcare providers up-to-date essential information and training to help them weather these times. This grant will support a referral network for essential workers to find licensed care, funding to help childcare programs remain open, costs of meals for children and costs related to training and webinars for childcare providers to learn about how this crisis will impact them. 

 

  • Southerners On New Ground ($38,400) Southerners On New Ground (SONG) is a resource for LGBTQ liberation across all lines of race, class, abilities, age, culture, gender and sexuality in the South. SONG’s response to COVID-19 includes broadening its usual service populations to include Black men and children, and the organization is now serving people ranging in age from 6 – 55 years. SONG’s response has two primary efforts – advocating for the release of people held in Fulton County jails to help prevent the spread of the disease and coordinating the neighborhood Mutual Aid efforts in the West End and Mechanicsville neighborhoods. The Mutual Aid work includes providing food and hand sanitizer to the unsheltered and emergency financial assistance and political education to young people. This grant will enable this work to continue for the next three months.   

 

Grants from the COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund focus on immediate and critical needs to support those most vulnerable. United Way and Community Foundation staff, with the guidance of a volunteer steering committee comprised of leading individuals from civic, corporate and nonprofit sectors across the region, are identifying additional organizations currently providing or receiving requests for support. 

The Fund created an application process for nonprofits across the region to explain their grant needs and indicate how the Fund could help. Open from April 6 – 10, more than 650 nonprofit organizations requested funding through this period, indicative of the significant impact the COVID-19 crisis is having on our region. 

The Fund was announced March 17 with Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta committing $1 million and United Way of Greater Atlanta contributing $500,000 to seed the Fund. As of today, commitments have been secured from  the Coca-Cola Company, Robert W. Woodruff Foundation, and the Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation, each donating $5 million to the Fund in support. Other current funders include the City of Atlanta, The Goizueta Foundation, The Klump Family Foundation and Truist Foundation, contributing $1 million each. A complete list of corporate, foundation and individual donors to the Fund can be found here.  

Individuals and families impacted and in need of support can contact United Way of Greater Atlanta’s 2-1-1 Contact Center. Due to high call volumes, texting is the quickest way to get in touch with United Way 2-1-1. Text 211od to 898-211 to get a list of resources by zip code. The 2-1-1 database is another quick way to find resources during this time of increased call volume. 2-1-1 is a valuable resource that is available 24-hours and 7 days-a-week.

Individuals who wish to contribute to supporting our region’s nonprofits can donate to the COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund here. Support funds will be released on a rolling basis throughout the outbreak and recovery phases of the crisis, updates will be posted on both the Community Foundation’s website and United Way’s website. Nonprofits as well as community members can share information on local needs through a digital listening tool on United Way’s website. The next round of grants will be announced in early May. 

The Community Foundation will continue to update details for donors and nonprofits through its blog and via social media via Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. To view updates from United Way of Greater Atlanta, click here or follow on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.

###

About the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta

Since 1951, the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta has been leading and inspiring philanthropy to increase the vitality of our region and the well-being of all residents. With nearly 70 years serving the 23-county Atlanta region and a robust team of experts, the Community Foundation expands its philanthropic reach and impact by providing quality services to donors and bold, innovative community leadership. The Community Foundation is a top-20 community foundation among 750 nationally, with approximately $1.2 billion in current assets, and is Georgia’s second largest foundation. For more information, visit: cfgreateratlanta.org or connect with the Foundation via Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.

 

About United Way of Greater Atlanta

United Way of Greater Atlanta, the largest United Way chapter in the nation, focuses on ensuring that every child in Atlanta has the opportunity to reach his or her full potential. The organization invests in more than 200 programs in 13 counties through the Child Well-Being Impact Fund and works to help children succeed in school, improve financial stability of families, provide affordable and accessible healthcare and end homelessness. For more information, visit: unitedwayatlanta.org or Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram.

 

Media Contacts:

For United Way United Way of Greater Atlanta

Chad Parker, 404.358.5055

cparker@unitedwayatlanta.org

By now, you’ve seen pictures, videos and heard stories about some of the scenes facing many of our hospitals around the United States—more recently a scene in Midtown Atlanta that spread around the Internet via social media.

Doctors, nurses and staff file in to work another long day uncertain of what they may encounter. As the shift changes, people look down from the windows of apartment complexes they’ve been confined to for the past three weeks, cheering and applauding these brave people.

These hospital workers put themselves in harm’s way in order to treat patients stricken with a novel, highly-contagious and potentially deadly virus. And they do this because it’s their job. They’ve been deemed “essential.” In the same way, so have many grocery store workers, city employees, law enforcement officers, retail employees, pharmacists—all of them risking exposure to help others feel safe and give them some sense of normalcy.

But take into account for a few minutes who it is they leave behind—who they leave each day they walk out their front door to work. Who takes care of their children?

“It’s been an interesting couple of weeks,” says Amanda Minix, director of development for YMCA of Metro Atlanta. “We made the decision pretty early on in alignment with the school systems to shut down our youth-serving programs, and so the best thing for us to do was to close down our branches completely.”

The reason for closing down these branches, and for forcing much of the city into a semi-quarantined state, is the pandemic outbreak of the novel coronavirus.

About two weeks into March, major cities across the country began shutting down restaurants, bars, gyms and schools in an attempt to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. As of April 14, the infectious disease, COVID-19, which is a respiratory illness with symptoms such as cough, fever and in severe cases, difficulty breathing, has infected more than 579,000 people nationwide and killed more than 22,000.  

Businesses shut down in Atlanta and its surrounding communities, and Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms on March 24 issued a “stay-at-home” order for the next 14 days.

Social distancing guidelines were encouraged at the federal, state and local levels.

But Minix knew there were kids whose families needed help. Many of these children were most vulnerable to food insecurity and relied on meals at school or snacks from the YMCA.

“We were able to leverage partnerships and existing food programs to provide immediate hunger relief,” she says. “We are adding sites and programs almost every few days to make sure needs are fulfilled.”

They are providing 5,500 snacks and dinners each week and more than 20,000 pounds of food, for a total of more than 1,150 bags of food for families in need.

Frontline Workers Childcare Program at Northwest

But there were still gaps in the services. YMCA started to notice the need for additional childcare.

“We’ve been in the childcare space for decades, and we have the ability and staff to take care of these children,” Minix says. “We began thinking of how we can do childcare for the parents who can’t work from home, and we realized it’s not just hospital staff, but police officers and other first responders, the people that work at grocery stores and other essential workers who you may not normally think of being on the frontlines of the crisis.”

In 13 YMCA locations, there were more than 500 registered for childcare over the past two weeks, and it has been growing every single day.

Minix says the classes are divided in a 1-9 ratio of teacher to students, and they started utilizing all parts of the YMCA facility so there wasn’t any overlap, people could keep their distance and not be in a confined, closed space. Each day, someone checks temperatures and symptoms of each person who walks through the door, and the staff deep cleans at all locations multiple times a day.

“We have a vigilance around hand-washing and cleaning to make sure we keep everyone healthy,” Minix says.

But they needed to be able to expand. She says they wanted to offer 2,000 childcare spots across Greater Atlanta.

But they needed help in order to expand.

A recent grant from United Way of Greater Atlanta and Community Foundation of Greater Atlanta will help YMCA of Metropolitan Atlanta grow to serve more families.

On March 26, United Way and Community Foundation of Greater Atlanta announced its first round of grants allocated from its Greater Atlanta COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund. YMCA of Metropolitan Atlanta was given $500,000 in grant funds.

“We have extended our hours from 5:30 a.m. to 8 pm.,” Minix says. “And starting [March 30] we have two sites that are able to serve infants.” The YMCA originally designed the program to serve children ages 3-12, but are now able to accommodate younger children as well.

Minix says they are just “trying to offer some relief” during this difficult time. All of the children are cared for by early learning professionals and are receiving programs that prepare these kids once they do go back to school.

“The Y has been here for more than 160 years, and we will be here to serve the community every day until this is over,” Minix says. “The needs change and there may be different phases, but we’re going to do everything we can to make sure we’re right there on the front lines, meeting the needs of the community.”

You can provide help today for YMCA of Metro Atlanta and other nonprofits who are filling in gaps in counties across Georgia during this time of crisis. Donate today to the Greater Atlanta COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund and provide resources and supports for these nonprofits across Greater Atlanta.

ATLANTA – April 14, 2020 – The Greater Atlanta COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund, a joint effort from Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta and United Way of Greater Atlanta, today announced the Fund’s fourth round of grants. Nearly $1.8 million will distribute to 18 organizations for emergency response. A grand total of more than $10.5 million from the Fund has been mobilized to benefit 62 nonprofits to date. Grants made in the earlier rounds are detailed on both the Community Foundation’s website and United Way’s website

 

Today’s grant recipients from the fourth round and their grant amounts, are: 

  • 100 Black Men of America ($25,000) In response to the COVID-19 crisis, 100 Black Men of America plans to provide computers and internet access to 500 Clayton County students in grades K-12. Additionally, it will host virtual town hall meetings bringing together faith, financial, medical and political leaders and experts with experience working in African American communities to give community members the opportunity to discuss the physical, emotional and economic impacts of the crisis, and to share accurate and up to date information about the pandemic in metro Atlanta. The grant will supplement costs for these activities for the next 90 days.

 

  • Action Ministries ($100,000) Action Ministries mobilizes communities to address the challenges of poverty by focusing on hunger relief, housing and education. In response to COVID-19, Action Ministries has expanded its child feeding programs and has added new prevention and housing services to those directly impacted by COVID-19. This grant has the potential to reduce the number of children that will be facing food insecurity in the coming weeks and can provide financial assistance to prevent homelessness. 

 

  • Atlanta Children’s Shelter ($50,000) Atlanta Children’s Shelter (ACS) supports families living in poverty in the metro Atlanta area who are facing or experiencing homelessness. Ninety-five percent of the families ACS serves are low or moderate income, and more than one third of the families they served last year were homeless due to domestic violence. Homeless and at-risk families have higher rates of chronic diseases than the rest of the population, tend to rely on services that make it harder to practice social distancing, and have a harder time accessing food and hygiene items. The grant will cover the costs of emergency rent and utility assistance, food, cleaning and disinfecting supplies, MARTA cards and mental health counseling provided to homeless, at-risk and recently housed families. 

 

  • Atlanta Police Department Foundation (APD Foundation) ($150,000) The APD Foundation is facing added costs from COVID-19 in order to allow the city’s first responders (APD, Fire/Rescue and related City employees) to carry out their respective duties safely and hygienically. The APD Foundation has received financial support from many corporate and private funders. This grant will fulfill the estimated remaining costs around their response, which includes testing and monitoring the health of first responders and frontline medical staff, access to personal protective equipment as well as increased demand for food and programming at the Westside At-Promise Youth and Community Center.

 

  • Atlanta Regional Commission ($95,000) As the Area Agency on Aging for the 10-county metro Atlanta region, Atlanta Regional Commission (ARC) issues notifications of funding availability for both the Federal Older Americans Act and state funds to provide direct services to older adults in the region. These are essential services including home delivered meals and congregate meals. ARC is working closely with its providers to find solutions to delivery challenges in the current climate and develop weekly communication channels with its most vulnerable clients. ARC also operates the Aging and Disability Resource Connection through which individuals speak with information and referral specialists about their needs. The grant will support one month of meal delivery for 625 seniors.

 

  • Catholic Charities Atlanta ($100,000) Catholic Charities Atlanta provides a holistic combination of social services to help individuals overcome barriers and achieve self-sufficiency. In response to COVID-19, it has transitioned to provide case management and emergency financial management services virtually. The organization is doing no-contact deliveries to get clients much-needed food and other supplies and has been disseminating language-appropriate resources to clients as well as helping clients apply for public benefits over the phone. It serves low-income families of all backgrounds, including immigrants (mostly Latinx), refugees, veterans and families involved with the Division of Family and Children Services. The grant will help cover the cost of rent and mortgage assistance and additional personnel, technology and supply costs to deliver their services.

 

  • Center for Family Resources ($150,000) Center for Family Resources (CFR) serves Cobb county families who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless through financial assistance, education and case management services. CFR has also been providing food through the emergency food distribution sites operating throughout Cobb county. Since the state of emergency was declared, CFR has created a new fund for emergency rental, housing, hotel and utility assistance. The grant will supplement this fund to assist those at risk of losing their current housing because of an inability to pay.

 

  • Community Assistance Resources and Emergency Services (CARES) ($20,000) CARES serves Pickens county and provides food and essential non-food items, temporary financial assistance, supplemental financing for education and counseling for those in need. CARES is providing boxes of food for families for curbside pick-up once per week. At this time, anyone who is in need receives food. For people who are not able to leave their homes, deputies with the Pickens County Sheriff’s Department are delivering food directly. The grant will support the cost of increased food and services currently needed.

 

  • Easter Seals North Georgia ($125,000) Easter Seals North Georgia (ESNG) focuses on strengthening children and families at the most critical times in a child’s development to ensure that all children have equal opportunities to live, learn, work and play in their communities. ESNG serves 5,000 children and their families, 71 percent of children served are living in poverty and 60 percent have a disability. ESNG had to close their 13 early education sites during the pandemic and is providing individualized, virtual learning to families they support. This grant will supplement federal and state funding to provide support and resources to families in the areas of childcare, food insecurity, healthcare, telehealth and early intervention to 2,500 children, providing individualized learning to 1,500 children and connecting families to local resources for critical needs during this time.

 

  • Georgia Foundation for Early Care and Learning ($250,000) As the nonprofit arm of the Georgia Department for Early Care and Learning (DECAL), the Georgia Foundation for Early Care and Learning is providing direct assistance to the network of childcare providers and the families they serve by addressing two critical needs: childcare coverage for essential workers and financial assistance for child care providers. Essential workers are scrambling to find childcare during the crisis and many are not equipped to pay the cost, so this grant will help the organization provide additional child and parent services scholarships. The grant will also enable one-time incentive payments to both open and closed childcare programs to help cover staff costs and purchase necessary supplies.

 

  • Helping Mamas ($75,000) Helping Mamas is the baby supply bank for metro Atlanta and much of north Georgia, providing diapers, wipes, formula, other baby supplies, and hygienic and health supplies to local nonprofits that distribute them directly to families. Helping Mamas has seen a drastic increase in the demand for their services and are currently distributing nearly 15,000 diapers a day, including to new partners like Communities in Schools of Atlanta, DFCS offices, Sheltering Arms and the YMCA. Grant funding will help the organization meet this heightened demand and increased staff support required to respond to the need.

 

  • Housing Justice League ($40,000) Housing Justice League works with renters and homeowners to self-organize and defend their right to remain in their homes and neighborhoods, primarily in the Peoplestown neighborhood in Atlanta. Its COVID-19 response includes ensuring low-wealth residents are receiving timely, accurate and useful information about the pandemic and how to report dangerous landlord behavior through a COVID-19 Hotline. Through the Hotline residents can get updates on housing policy changes, access community resources and receive tenant organizing advice and assistance. Assistance is available in multiple languages. The grant will cover the cost of additional capacity for the COVID-19 Hotline.

 

  • Jewish Family and Career Services ($200,000) In response to the coronavirus pandemic, the organization has implemented telehealth and alternate options for critical services and has expanded emergency assistance services. For all clinical services, including mental health counseling, substance abuse counseling, support groups and assistance for domestic violence victims and survivors, individual and group sessions are available through telehealth phone sessions or via video conference. Emergency assistance services being provided include financial health and food for those with increased needs due to job losses, increased medical costs or childcare expenses. Based on current call volume, the organization could provide $716,250 in emergency financial assistance in 90 days, as well as $50,000-$100,000 in food costs. The grant will help support these increased costs.

 

  • Just People ($100,000) Just People has had to cancel all social events, suspend their day program, close administrative offices and cut staff salaries. All non-critical medical appointments have been postponed while therapy and psychiatric appointments have transitioned to online or phone appointments. To date, 32 of Just People’s clients – live-in adults with developmental disabilities, traumatic brain injuries and mental illnesses – have been laid off or fired from their jobs, making it impossible for them to pay their rent and utilities or purchase food. Just People has created a “store” for clients to shop (at no cost) for toiletries, frozen and canned food, snacks, drinks and staples like bread, milk and fruit. This grant will address the increased need for rent and utilities support. 

 

  • Literacy for All ($60,000) Literacy for All (LFA) connects the Georgia literacy community to innovate, champion and fund multi-generational literacy opportunities. Many low-income families around the state do not have internet service needed for their children to actively engage in online learning and continue their education consistently during this crisis. LFA started an Emergency Connectivity Initiative, partnering with the Georgia Department of Education (GaDOE), Governor’s Office of Student Achievement, the Georgia Public Library Service and other organizations to address this urgent need. This grant will allow matching funds for LFA to purchase approximately 1,000 Wi-Fi devices with coverage plans to support families in need through the next 60 days.

 

  • National Church Residences Foundation (NCR) ($95,000) NCR provides high-quality care, services and residential communities for seniors. The organization’s topmost priority is to ensure the basic care needs of its senior residents are met. For the 1,465 Atlanta residents served, NCR is guaranteeing residents have food, paper products and cleaning supplies. NCR will also partner with Fulton County Senior Services to use its Big Bethel Village commercial kitchen as a food preparation and delivery hub to deliver over 300 meals to greater Atlanta seniors to three communities (one meal per day). In order to do so, the kitchen must be completely cleaned and disinfected to meet food safety standards and repairs need to be made to the existing commercial refrigerator and freezer for food storage, and the grant will support these added costs.

 

  • Real Life Center ($100,000) Real Life Center provides a safe place for people from all walks of life going through these tough times to access resources that create stability and strengthen families and our community. In response to COVID-19, Real Life Center is offering emergency food assistance to anyone in need in Coweta and Fayette counties, offering pre-bagged uncooked meals with enough food for a week, including produce and meats. The organization is currently serving 250 families a week, which is double the number of families it typically serves this time of year and expected to rise. This grant will support food supplies and distribution for approximately six weeks. 

 

  • Single Parent Alliance and Resource Center ($50,000) Single Parent Alliance and Resource Center (SPARC) was founded by an African American single mother to work with single parents to provide the necessary tools, resources and support to create a healthy and nurturing home environment. SPARC is a placed-based agency that works directly in the apartment complexes in which their clients live. Since the COVID-19 outbreak SPARC has called over 100 single parents to assess their immediate needs. This grant will help provide emergency food as well as financial support to prevent eviction and utility shut off for single parent families, 90 percent of whom are parents of color.

 

Grants from the COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund focus on immediate and critical needs to support those most vulnerable. United Way and Community Foundation staff, with the guidance of a volunteer steering committee comprised of leading individuals from civic, corporate and nonprofit sectors across the region, are identifying additional organizations currently providing or receiving requests for support. 

 

The Fund created an application process for nonprofits across the region to explain their grant needs and indicate how the Fund could help. Open from April 6 – 10, more than 650 nonprofit organizations requested funding through this period, indicative of the significant impact the COVID-19 crisis is having on our region. Grant announcements from the applications received will be made the week of April 27. 

 

The Fund was announced March 17 with Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta committing $1 million and United Way of Greater Atlanta contributing $500,000 to seed the Fund. As of today, commitments have been secured from  the Coca-Cola Company, Robert W. Woodruff Foundation, and the Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation, each donated $5 million to the Fund in support. Other current funders include the City of Atlanta, The Goizueta Foundation, The Klump Family Foundation and Truist Foundation, contributing $1 million each, Gas South, Global Payments and Wells Fargo contributing $250,000 each, the Sara Giles Moore Foundation contributing $100,000, Holder Construction Company, The Primerica Foundation and Regions Bank contributing $50,000 each, Anthem, the Betty and Davis Fitzgerald Foundation, Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP, KPMG, RSUI Indemnity Company, Scana Energy and The Vasser Wooley Foundation, Inc., contributing $25,000 each, and $25,000 jointly from 11Alive and the TEGNA Foundation

 

Individuals and families impacted and in need of support can contact United Way of Greater Atlanta’s 2-1-1 Contact Center. Due to high call volumes, texting is the quickest way to get in touch with United Way 2-1-1. Text 211od to 898-211 to get a list of resources by zip code. The 2-1-1 database is another quick way to find resources during this time of increased call volume. 2-1-1 is a valuable resource that is available 24-hours and 7 days-a-week.

 

Individuals who wish to contribute to supporting our region’s nonprofits can donate to the COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund here. Support funds will be released on a rolling basis throughout the outbreak and recovery phases of the crisis, updates will be posted on both the Community Foundation’s website and United Way’s website. Nonprofits as well as community members can share information on local needs through a digital listening tool on United Way’s website. The next round of grants will be announced the week of April 27. 

 

The Community Foundation will continue to update details for donors and nonprofits through its blog and via social media via Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. To view updates from United Way of Greater Atlanta, click here or follow on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.

 

About the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta

Since 1951, the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta has been leading and inspiring philanthropy to increase the vitality of our region and the well-being of all residents. With nearly 70 years serving the 23-county Atlanta region and a robust team of experts, the Community Foundation expands its philanthropic reach and impact by providing quality services to donors and bold, innovative community leadership. The Community Foundation is a top-20 community foundation among 750 nationally, with approximately $1.2 billion in current assets, and is Georgia’s second largest foundation. For more information, visit: cfgreateratlanta.org or connect with the Foundation via Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.

 

About United Way of Greater Atlanta

United Way of Greater Atlanta, the largest United Way chapter in the nation, focuses on ensuring that every child in Atlanta has the opportunity to reach his or her full potential. The organization invests in more than 200 programs in 13 counties through the Child Well-Being Impact Fund and works to help children succeed in school, improve financial stability of families, provide affordable and accessible healthcare and end homelessness. For more information, visit: unitedwayatlanta.org or Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram.

 

Media Contacts:

For United Way United Way of Greater Atlanta

Chad Parker, 404.358.5055

cparker@unitedwayatlanta.org

ATLANTA – April 6, 2020 – In March, Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta and United Way of Greater Atlanta announced the Greater Atlanta COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund to direct funding to nonprofits on the front lines helping our region weather this unprecedented health and economic crisis.

Today, our organizations announce the Fund’s third round of grants, totaling nearly $4.6 million, to 27 organizations for emergency response. A grand total of more than $8.7 million from the Fund has been mobilized for nonprofits to date. Grants made in the earlier rounds are detailed on both the Community Foundation’s website and United Way’s website

Today’s grant recipients, and grant amounts, are: 

Access to Capital for Entrepreneurs ($250,000) Access to Capital for Entrepreneurs, Inc. (ACE) provides economic development to underserved people and communities including women and minority business owners. COVID-19 poses an economic calamity for entrepreneurs in these populations who generally have lower margins and cash reserves. This grant will cover operating costs of ACE’s Emergency Loan Product, providing working capital micro loans of up to $50,000 for current ACE clients along with up to six months of principal and interest payment deferment and technical assistance for clients to apply and secure funding.

Atlanta Partners For Education (APS Foundation) ($280,000) Atlanta Partners For Education (APFE) has been the Atlanta Public Schools (APS) Foundation for nearly 40 years, serving as the gateway through which the corporate and philanthropic communities support student achievement and develop strategic solutions to challenges that impact APS students and families. The grant will support COVID-19 specific programs in nutrition and technology, providing free meals for students and families and securing laptops and internet access for distance learning.

Fulton Education Foundation ($300,000) The Fulton Education Foundation takes a needs-based approach for students of Fulton County, especially those experiencing homelessness, in foster care or living in motels, who face challenges including food insecurity and access to health supports. The grant will contribute to the costs of housing, food, and therapy for 1,765 Fulton County students presenting the greatest needs – experiencing homelessness, living in foster care or living in motels and connectivity and devices for virtual learning for Fulton County students.

Gateway and Evolution Center ($150,000) Gateway Center (GWC) serves a critical role in providing services to the people experiencing homelessness as the entry point to City of Atlanta’s Continuum of Care, including shelter, access to showers and laundry facilities, information on the COVID-19 virus and its symptoms, safety precautions and knowledge of access testing. Due to stay-at-home orders and the closing of some community kitchens, GWC is now serving additional meals and seeing an expanded population of individuals needing services. This grant will allow the agency to continue to provide services to the homeless population residing in their shelter and additional personnel costs. Serving the homeless population is critical in our region’s effort to flatten the curve.

Goodr ($250,000) Goodr provides food for those in need and recognizes that school meals are the only source of nourishment for many underprivileged children. Even with school-based food pickup options for students, many parents are now out of work, do not have reliable access to transportation and have an increased need for food in their homes. With an uptick in requests, Goodr is working to support more families and senior homes to help them through this pandemic and has hired additional drivers to deliver groceries and ready-to-eat meals. The grant will cover 30 days of service to more than 100 families in the community.

Hearts to Nourish Hope ($150,000) Hearts to Nourish Hope was established in 1995 to meet the needs of high-risk populations in Clayton and Gwinnett counties in areas of education, workforce development, housing and essential needs. Grant funding will go toward housing support for families with children, senior citizens and those most vulnerable during this time. Specifically, funds will help provide housing and utilities with a focus in the Southern Crescent, an underserved part of the region.

Hosea Helps ($200,000) Hosea Helps (formerly Hosea Feed the Hungry) works with families in the City of Atlanta to prevent homelessness, address hunger in children and to ensure that individuals in poverty or at risk of poverty have financial resources and tools to become stable. Because of COVID-19, Hosea Helps has increased distribution of food and supplies while also assisting partner organizations. The grant will help cover the costs of purchasing food for box distribution to 19,000 individuals, rent/mortgage assistance for 65 individuals/families, and increased staffing and equipment costs to be able to serve additional individuals and families in need.

Housing Plus, Inc. ($125,000) Housing Plus, Inc. (HPI) is a comprehensive solution to homeless issues in the greater Atlanta area. Due to COVID-19, HPI has moved to digital platforms to address safety concerns while focusing on rapidly rehousing and providing basic needs support to individuals experiencing or fleeing from domestic violence and trafficking situations. All referrals come from a network of pro-bono law firms. Funding will support efforts to serve these vulnerable individuals and help to reduce the number of families who will be facing eviction and homelessness in the coming weeks.

International Rescue Committee in Atlanta ($150,000) International Rescue Committee (IRC) provides comprehensive case management support for refugee and immigrant populations throughout the greater Atlanta region. Staff has now transitioned to virtual service for clients. Due to travel restrictions, admission of refugees to the U.S. has been halted and IRC anticipates a reduction in federal funding. The grant will allow IRC to continue to provide resources including healthcare and employment benefits for immigrants and refugees.

LaAmistad, Inc. ($100,000) LaAmistad assists 300 Latino students and their families annually. Many students qualify for free/reduced lunch programs, and their parents largely work low-income jobs that are now being severely reduced. During the COVID-19 crisis, LaAmistad’s staff has had weekly calls with families served to determine specific needs for each, which include rent support, medical care and online tutoring. This grant will allow LaAmistad to provide approximately two weeks of emergency food supplies to the families it serves.

Mercy Care ($150,000) Established in 1985, Mercy Care provides compassionate, clinically excellent healthcare to those in need, with special attention to the poor and vulnerable. Mercy Care is working with multiple partners and agencies to ensure the homeless community, especially the street-bound population, have access to the necessary health services to test and treat individuals with COVID-19. The grant will help cover the additional costs of Mercy Care’s expanded services and efforts to address COVID-19, including expanded telehealth services.

Meridian Educational Resource Group d/b/a Whitefoord, Inc. ($243,000) For 24 years Whitefoord has focused on ensuring children are healthy, safe and prepared for school through early childhood education and health services. Whitefoord’s two clinics have remained open to meet the basic health needs of the community, including offering COVID-19 testing as well as dental, mental health and physical health services. During the crisis Whitefoord has implemented phone-based screenings, telehealth capability and online education resources for families while school is closed. The grant will help fund the continuation of these services for Whitefoord’s population, more than 28% of whom are low income with increased need for social safety net programs.

Metropolitan Counseling Services ($90,000) Metropolitan Counseling Services provides affordable mental health services for the residents of Georgia. Prior to the crisis, more than 90% of the mental health services provided occurred through in-person individual and group interactions. Given the social distancing measures established, counseling has shifted to technology-based forms, which is difficult for both the clients and the therapists. This grant will support the increased cost for services, including supervisory consultation, staff training, client assistance and software enhancements.

Midwest Food Bank – Georgia ($50,000) Midwest Food Bank (MFB) works to alleviate hunger and malnutrition locally and throughout the world and provide disaster relief without discrimination. MFB currently serves more than 300 nonprofit organizations in the Southeast, 270 of those in the Atlanta area, serving nearly 155,000 individuals and families each month. The grant will help cover an anticipated 35 percent increase in food demand and distribution due to the COVID-19 crisis.

Nicholas House, Inc. ($75,000) Nicholas House, Inc. supports low-income families experiencing or at-risk of being homeless in metro Atlanta. Some individuals have mental health conditions or underlying conditions that increase their risk for COVID-19, such as HIV/AIDS, diabetes and high blood pressure. The organization maintains a shelter and also provides rental assistance for clients living in apartments. This grant will help to cover the costs of food, sanitation supplies, emergency assistance to families facing eviction and expanded services to prevent homelessness for more families across the metro Atlanta region.

Norcross Cooperative Ministry, Inc. ($200,000) Norcross Cooperative Ministry is a coalition of churches that provide services to low-income and homeless families in their community. Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, the cooperative typically served 50 to 70 families per day. Today they have seen a 700 percent increase in families needing support, including past clients whose situations have worsened, new clients who are homeless or live in extended stay hotels and others with vulnerable housing situations. The grant will help to cover rent assistance, temporary lodging, and food for clients for the next 60 days.

North Fulton Community Charities($200,000) Since 1983, North Fulton Community Charities (NFCC) has addressed homelessness and hunger in North Fulton county, serving nearly 10,000 annually. Due to the current climate, NFCC has had to close their thrift store, their main source of revenue, while seeing a significant increase in need. NFCC is also seeing greater need among self-employed and small business owners. Grant funds will help support restocking food pantries and providing financial assistance to populations including single working mothers, custodial grandparents and immigrant families.

Open Doors Solutions, Inc. ($150,000) Open Doors Solutions works primarily with those transitioning from homelessness, many of whom are single parents with at least two children, into safe, affordable homes. Open Doors works with landlords and property management companies to help lower barriers to housing access. This grant will support current efforts to provide housing through a referral system and provide rental assistance, freeing up desperately needed capacity in the shelter pipeline.

Partnership Against Domestic Violence ($10,000) Partnership Against Domestic Violence (PADV) was founded in 1977 to end the crime of intimate partner violence and empower its survivors. PADV is currently still offering shelter services and a 24-hours crisis line, providing safety planning, remote counseling and legal advocacy. This grant will assist those currently facing domestic violence issues via shelter services or emergency motel stays, to ensure housing security and protect children and vulnerable populations from high levels of abuse likely to happen during increasingly stressful periods.

Salvation Army ($200,000) The Salvation Army’s food pantries remain open with higher demands, and several locations have expanded pantry hours and transitioned to drive-through feeding programs as well as food delivery through mobile kitchens. The Salvation Army is currently serving approximately 1,300 families and 4,000 individuals per week, and expect this to increase. Demand has increased at their two shelters in Atlanta and in the rapid re-housing program in Gwinnett. The grant will support these services and the increase in rent/utility assistance requests from those that are impacted by job loss or reduced hours due to COVID-19.

Ser Familia ($100,000) Ser Familia is dedicated to strengthening Latino families through programs that support healthy family environments, as one of the only sources of counseling provided in Spanish in the state. Many of Ser Familia’s clients work in hospitality and construction, some of the first sectors to be impacted by furloughs and layoffs. Group counseling sessions (including domestic violence support groups) are now limited to 10 people per session, which has led to an increase in the number of sessions and increased staff hours. This grant will increase the organization’s capacity to continue providing no-cost mental health counseling in Spanish, as well as provide food, emergency assistance and transportation for people who have been denied services from other emergency assistance providers who require a state ID or social security number.

Sheltering Arms, Inc. ($250,000) Sheltering Arms serves vulnerable infants, children and their families throughout metropolitan Atlanta. This grant will help the organization respond to the on-going needs of Sheltering Arms’ families for support, including Family Support Coaches to help families navigate resources and systems; purchasing and distributing diapers, wipes, formula and other goods for the hygienic needs of families; continued learning, development and family engagement; and the development of a food pantry to ensure that families are able to access food during the crisis.

Southside Medical Center ($250,000) Southside serves more than 45,000 people annually, providing services on a sliding-scale fee. More than five percent of Southside’s patient population are served in a language other than English and more than 57 percent live on low income up to 100 percent of the federal poverty level. During this time, Southside Medical Center will continue to see patients when clinically necessary at 11 locations throughout metro Atlanta – with walk-in sites operating in Butts, Clayton, DeKalb, Gwinnett and Fulton counties. Southside is maximizing the use of telemedicine services to lessen patient wait times in clinics, and to use directly with those who can (or should) shelter-in-place at home. Additionally, Southside is collaborating with state efforts around COVID-19 by utilizing its mobile medical unit to provide rapid response testing.

State Charter Schools Foundation of Georgia ($200,000) The State Charter Schools Foundation of Georgia provides support and funding to state charter schools throughout Georgia, including 18 schools located in the greater Atlanta community, who serve nearly 9,000 students. These schools are providing distance learning to students while they are closed and ensuring equitable access is crucial – the most critical needs are technology devices and internet access for low-income students and remote tutoring for at-risk students. The grant will allow the organization to purchase technology devices and pay for internet access for 1,341 low-income students and provide remote tutoring services for 905 high-risk students for six weeks.

Sweetwater Mission ($155,000) Sweetwater Mission provides food, clothing, education and support services to neighbors in need. It is distributing food in response to the crisis – each car receives  50 pounds of bread, eggs, meat, milk and additional items, and 60 pounds if there are children in the home. Sweetwater is providing food to an average of 85 families in need per day and grant funding will assist while need continues to increase as the effects of the virus are experienced.

Wellspring Living ($195,000) Wellspring Living supports domestic sex trafficking victims, and those at risk, with specialized recovery services through four residential programs, two community-based programs and graduate services. During the COVID-19 crisis Wellspring Living’s community programs are supporting participants virtually and residential programs remain in operation, requiring the need for hiring clinical support staff and providing personal protective equipment, as well as serving additional food due to increased requests and decreased donations. The grant will support Wellspring Living’s rapid response to these increased service needs as requests for their services continue to rise.  

Zion Hill Community Development Center ($125,000) Zion Hill Community Development Center seeks to promote revitalization and redevelopment of selected areas in metropolitan Atlanta and to empower citizens through economic, residential, social and educational programs. Zion Hill has adapted services from walk-in, face-to-face appointments to an online delivery system. Zion Hill will use grant funding to provide technology and online delivery service addressing transitional housing, rapid rehousing and utility support. In response to the pandemic, Zion Hill has also expanded its service areas from only South Fulton to include City of Atlanta and Clayton counties.

Grants from the COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund focus on immediate and critical needs to support those most vulnerable. United Way and Community Foundation staff, with the guidance of a volunteer steering committee comprised of leading individuals from civic, corporate and nonprofit sectors across the region, are identifying additional organizations currently providing or receiving requests for support. This includes working closely with the State of Georgia’s Coronavirus Task Force Committee for Homeless and Displaced Persons, and other state and federal supports that are to be issued in the coming days and weeks.

The Fund was announced March 17 with Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta committing $1 million and United Way of Greater Atlanta contributing $500,000 to seed the Fund. As of today, commitments have been secured from  the Coca-Cola Company, Robert W. Woodruff Foundation, and the Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation, each donated $5 million to the Fund in support. Other current funders include the City of Atlanta, Truist Foundation,The Goizueta Foundation and The Klump Family Foundation contributing $1 million each, the Sara Giles Moore Foundation and Regions Bank contributing $100,000 each, Wells Fargo and Global Payments contributing $250,000 each, The Primerica Foundation contributing $50,000, the Betty and Davis Fitzgerald Foundation, Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP and The Vasser Wooley Foundation, Inc. contributing $25,000, and $25,000 jointly from 11Alive and the TEGNA Foundation.

Individuals and families impacted and in need of support can contact United Way of Greater Atlanta’s 2-1-1 Contact Center. Due to high call volumes, texting is the quickest way to get in touch with United Way 2-1-1. Text 211od to 898-211 to get a list of resources by zip code. The 2-1-1 database is another quick way to find resources during this time of increased call volume. 2-1-1 is a valuable resource that is available 24-hours and 7 days-a-week.

The need continues to rise as stories accumulate from across our neighborhoods. To donate to the COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund, click here. Support funds will be released on a rolling basis throughout the outbreak and recovery phases of the crisis. Details on how nonprofit organizations can share their need will be released this week via the Community Foundation’s website, as well as a grant process specifically for arts organizations. The next round of grants will be announced mid April.

The Community Foundation will continue to update details for donors and nonprofits through its blog and via social media via Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. To view updates from United Way of Greater Atlanta, click here or follow on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.

 

About the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta
Since 1951, the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta has been leading and inspiring philanthropy to increase the vitality of our region and the well-being of all residents. With nearly 70 years serving the 23-county Atlanta region and a robust team of experts, the Community Foundation expands its philanthropic reach and impact by providing quality services to donors and bold, innovative community leadership. The Community Foundation is a top-20 community foundation among 750 nationally, with approximately $1.2 billion in current assets, and is Georgia’s second largest foundation. For more information, visit: cfgreateratlanta.org or connect with the Foundation via Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.

About United Way of Greater Atlanta
United Way of Greater Atlanta, the largest United Way chapter in the nation, focuses on ensuring that every child in Atlanta has the opportunity to reach his or her full potential. The organization invests in more than 200 programs in 13 counties through the Child Well-Being Impact Fund and works to help children succeed in school, improve financial stability of families, provide affordable and accessible healthcare and end homelessness. For more information, visit: unitedwayatlanta.org or Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram.

 

Media Contacts:
For United Way United Way of Greater Atlanta
Chad Parker, 404.358.5055
cparker@unitedwayatlanta.org