United Way of Greater Atlanta is on a journey to improve the lives of children and families throughout the Greater Atlanta area. Nearly half a million children in our region live in communities with low or very low child well-being. Through our Child Well-Being Mission Fund, we invest in nonprofit partners that provide the supports necessary to strengthen the community. We recognize that it takes many different nonprofit partners to meet the complex needs of families. In January, we opened a request for proposals for our 2022 Child Well Being Mission Fund with grant awards being announced in May. For this round of investments, we focused on new nonprofit partners with targeted funding opportunities for small; grassroots; and Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC)-led organizations. Overall, the median budget size for the organizations funded was $550,000. We also debuted organizational capacity building opportunities to provide partners with an opportunity to strengthen their organizational processes in order to undergird their programmatic efforts. Overall, 88% of the organizations funded have a budget size of under $2,000,000 and more than half of those receiving grant awards are BIPOC organizations.

“I am very impressed with the intentionality and thoughtfulness during this open request for proposals, and how amazing it is to be able to transition our investments in this way,” says Angel Maldonado, Co-Chair, Community Impact Committee. I know the team has been working extremely hard. I am really inspired that new organizations had the chance to receive funding, and I love the fact that even for those that didn’t get a chance to be funded in this round, the team will continue to work with them and continue to be a resource to them.”

United Way received a total of 122 applications to review across all investment portfolio areas. After a thorough review of each application, United Way is pleased to announce that 32 applicants were awarded grants ranging from $25,000 – $150,000 under the following strategies:

  • Strong Learners:
    • Build Reading Skills – 4 grants
    • Increase Healthcare Navigation – 1 grant
  • College and Career Ready:
    • Career Pathway – 2 grants
  • Economic Stability:
    • Secure Housing – 1 grant
    • Basic Needs and Equitable Access – 6 grants
    • Build Wealth – 6 grants
  • Brighter Future:
    • Strengthen Resident Leadership & Learning – 3 grants
    • Community Organizing & Civic Engagement – 3 grants
  • Capacity Building:
    • Organizational Capacity Building​ – 5 grants
    • Resiliency Planning Capacity Building – 1 grant

 

In this funding cycle, investments were also made through our strategic partnership with the Georgia Division of Family and Children’s Services (DFCS) to address learning loss​ through our College and Career Ready investment portfolio area. Those grant awards are scheduled to be announced by the end of May,” says Mary Benton, Co-Chair Community Impact Committee. I participated as an independent reviewer for grant applications in this open request for proposals. It was very interesting to be able to see the application process and what United Way is asking of the organizations in order to gauge if they will be a good fit to help us reach our goals. I was very impressed with the process and was happy to do it.”

Putting our community’s children on an equitable path to fulfilling their potential requires us to work together toward a single, shared agenda. United Way knows that together, we can ensure this is an equitable, thriving community. That is the work of the Child Well-Being Mission Fund.  For more information on the grant awards for our open request for proposals or to donate to the child well-being mission fund, please click here.

This story was previously published on SaportaReport.com.

United Way of Greater Atlanta is on a journey to improve the lives of children and families throughout the Greater Atlanta area. Nearly half a million children in our region live in communities with low or very low child well-being. Through our Child Well-Being Mission Fund, we invest in nonprofit partners that provide the supports necessary to strengthen the community. We recognize that it takes many different nonprofit partners to meet the complex needs of families.

In January, we opened a request for proposals for our 2022 Child Well Being Mission Fund with grant awards being announced in May. For this round of investments, we focused on new nonprofit partners with targeted funding opportunities for small; grassroots; and Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC)-led organizations. Each of the Requests for Proposals (RFPs) identified specific strategies that we are looking to fund within each Investment Priority area: Strong Learners, College and Career Ready, Economic Stability and Brighter Future. In addition, the fifth priority area addressed was Capacity Building to address significant operational and/or programmatic impacts as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Grantees for the Learning Loss grant will be announced later this month. If you have questions about our RFP process, please submit them here

Grantees: Strong Learners

Leap for Literacy | Strategy: Build Reading Skills | Award: $50,000

The Bonner Office for Civic Engagement  | Strategy: Build Reading Skills | Award: $50,000

Fayette FACTOR | Strategy: Healthcare Navigation | Award: $25,000

Family Heritage Foundation Inc. | Strategy: Build Reading Skills | Award: $25,000

Share the Magic Foundation, Inc. | Strategy: Build Reading Skills | Award: $50,000

 

Grantees: College and Career Ready

Cobb Works | Strategy: Expand Career Pathways| Award: $75,000

Strive Atlanta | Strategy: Expand Career Pathways | Award: $100,000

 

Grantees: Economic Stability

Amani Women Center  | Strategy: Build Wealth | Award: $40,000

On the Rise Community Development, Inc. | Strategy: Build Wealth | Award: $35,000

Rainbow Village | Strategy: Build Wealth | Award: $40,000

Refugee Family Assistance Program | Strategy: Build Wealth | Award: $25,000

S.H.A.R.E House | Strategy: Secure Housing | Award: $50,000

Youth Empowerment Success Services | Strategy: Build Wealth | Award: $35,000

Zion Hill Community Development Center | Strategy: Build Wealth | Award: $35,000

Community Farmers Markets  | Strategy: Basic Needs & Equitable Access | Award: $35,000

Concrete Jungle  | Strategy: Basic Needs & Equitable Access | Award: $35,000

Focused Community Strategies | Strategy: Basic Needs & Equitable Access | Award: $35,000

HABESHA, Inc. | Strategy: Basic Needs & Equitable Access | Award: $35,000

The Common Market Southeast | Strategy: Basic Needs & Equitable Access | Award: $35,000

The Pittsburgh Collaborative | Strategy: Basic Needs & Equitable Access | Award: $35,000

 

Grantees: Brighter Future

Canopy Atlanta | Strategy: Strengthen Resident Leadership & Learning | Award: $35,000

Clarkston Community Center Foundation | Strategy: Strengthen Resident Leadership & Learning | Award: $60,000

EndState ATL | Strategy: Community Organizing & Civic Engagement | Award: $150,000

YouthServ360 | Strategy: Strengthen Resident Leadership & Learning | Award: $125,000

Housing Justice League | Strategy: Community Organizing & Civic Engagement | Award: $125,000

Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University (HEART) | Strategy: Community Led Solutions | Award: $300,000*

*This grant is funded in partnership with the Jesse Parker Williams Foundation 

 

Grantees: Capacity Building

Grove Park Foundation | Strategy: Organizational Capacity Building | Award: $50,000

Showcase Group | Strategy: Organizational Capacity Building | Award: $25,000

Common Good Atlanta | Strategy: Organizational Capacity Building | Award: $25,000

Just Bakery of Atlanta | Strategy: Organizational Capacity Building | Award: $25,000

Together Friends Organization | Strategy: Organizational Capacity Building | Award: $25,000

Georgia Center for Nonprofits – GCN  | Resiliency Planning Capacity Building | Award: $71,250

 

 

To date, the program has helped 10,155 households affected by the COVID-19 pandemic

United Way of Greater Atlanta and the City of Atlanta has reopened the Atlanta COVID-19 Emergency Housing Assistance Program with $20.2 million in reallocated ERAP 1 funding from the U.S. Department of Treasury available for rent, gas utilities, electric utilities, apartment security fees, security deposit, trash removal, and internet services. Due to federal guidelines, the program will no longer provide mortgage assistance. Since 2020, the Atlanta COVID-19 Emergency Housing Assistance Program has been able to help 10,155 families and individuals affected by the COVID-19 pandemic to stay in their homes.

Housing instability has been a problem for low-income residents in the City of Atlanta long before the COVID-19 pandemic reached the City of Atlanta. Income and job loss exacerbated by inflation and increased housing costs are contributing to the increased risk of foreclosure, eviction, and homelessness.

“Housing and economic stability are foundational to child well-being”,  says Milton J. Little, Jr. President and CEO of United Way of Greater Atlanta. “Without this, children and families have little chance of moving out of poverty. We are proud to have helped over 10,155 households to-date. We are also proud to say that in each round of funding, our organization and our partners have been able to spend the full amount of funding to assist City of Atlanta residents.”

Incorporated City of Atlanta residential renters who have experienced a loss of income either directly or indirectly because of COVID-19 will be able to receive assistance through the Atlanta COVID-19 Emergency Housing Assistance Program. Funds can be applied to current/past due (arrears) expenses up to 15 months or prospective (future months) expenses up to three (3) months for  rent, gas utilities, electric utilities, apartment security fees, security deposit, trash removal, and internet services.  However, the total months of assistance cannot exceed 15 months. To receive payment for internet fees, applicants must prove that at the time of the expense they have/had a school-age child mandated to participate in remote learning, or they were mandated to work from home as a result of the COVID-19 Pandemic.

Individuals and families impacted and in need of support will have multiple access points to apply for assistance in both English and Spanish. To apply for assistance and view eligibility requirements and FAQs, options include:

  • Access the client application by visiting www.unitedwayatlanta.org or by clicking here.
  • Visit http://211online.unitedwayatlanta.org/
  • Call 2-1-1 to speak with a live 2-1-1 Community Connection Specialist Hours are limited from 8:00 am to 7:00 pm, Monday through Friday. Due to high call volumes, the above listed options are preferred.

For more information, visit www.unitedwayatlanta.org.

 

About United Way of Greater Atlanta

United Way of Greater Atlanta, the largest United Way chapter in the nation, focuses on ensuring that every child in Greater Atlanta has the opportunity to reach his or her full potential. The organization invests in more than 200 programs in 13 counties through the Child Well-Being Impact Fund and works to help children succeed in school, improve financial stability of families, provide affordable and accessible healthcare and end homelessness. For more information, visit www.unitedwayatlanta.org.

 

About City of Atlanta

For more information about the City of Atlanta, please visit www.atlantaga.gov or watch City Channel 26. Follow the City of Atlanta on Facebook, Twitter @CityofAtlanta and Instagram @CityofAtlantaGA.

This story was previously published on SaportaReport.com.

ATLANTA – January 28, 2022 – Wells Fargo today announced a $20 million donation to help Atlanta small business owners own more of their businesses’ assets, including property and equipment, and to enable physical upgrades to their facilities. The United Way of Greater Atlanta, in collaboration with Invest Atlanta, will distribute the funding as a mix of grants and loans in the city, with a focus on Black-owned and other diverse-owned businesses.

The donation comes from Wells Fargo’s Open for Business Fund, a roughly $420 million fund that the company created in July 2020 to help small businesses stay open during the COVID-19 pandemic. The fund has focused on racially and ethnically diverse small businesses, which have been disproportionately impacted by the pandemic. The fund was created from the gross processing fees that Wells Fargo made from administering Paycheck Protection Program loans in 2020. Wells Fargo has collaborated with Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFIs) and local nonprofits across the nation to distribute funding.

“Helping small businesses persevere through the pandemic has been a major focus of ours for the past two years,” said Charlie Scharf, Wells Fargo’s CEO. “As a company, we have a commitment to make the communities where we operate stronger, and to do it at a very local level. Making a large donation in Atlanta — one of the largest donations we’ve made from the Open for Business Fund — was important to us. We know it will make a difference for small business owners here.”

United Way of Greater Atlanta, with expertise from Invest Atlanta, will administer the $20 million donation around four initiatives:

  • Small Business Loan Fund — Low-cost loans, capped at an interest rate of 3%, are designated to help small businesses grow ownership of tangible assets.
  • Asset Building Assistance — Working with nonprofit organizations, including in south and west Atlanta, this effort will enlist experts to craft asset-building strategies for roughly 200 small businesses, such as moving from renting or leasing commercial space to owning it.
  • Façade Improvement Grants — Grants of up to $50,000 for exterior improvements for small businesses that contribute a 20% match to their project.
  • Commercial Ownership Growth — Capital to help small business owners facing rising rental costs, including down payment assistance grants of up to $200,000 to purchase commercial real estate.

“This Wells Fargo grant program gives small business owners the opportunity to grow and expand by owning more of their own assets—which can be a game changer for the financial health of any business,” said Mayor Andre Dickens. “As a former small business owner, I understand the vital role of small businesses in Atlanta’s economy and community, and we are excited to announce this program in the first few weeks of our new administration.”

“With help from Wells Fargo’s Open for Business Fund, I opened a new space in downtown Atlanta,” said Rahel TafarI, a native of Ethiopia who owns Grant Park Coffeehouse and who benefited from an earlier Open for Business Fund grantee, Access to Capital for Entrepreneurs. “I have stability now, and we are looking to soon open another coffee shop and Ethiopian restaurant that I will own near Grant Park. Diverse-owned businesses like mine bring culture to where people want to work and live.”

“As a member of the House Financial Services Committee I’ve worked to help small businesses in the Fifth District Build Back Better,” said Congresswoman Nikema Williams. “I want to thank Wells Fargo for this investment in Atlanta-area small businesses and recognizing that businesses owned by Black and brown people have been disproportionately hurt during the pandemic. That Wells Fargo selected the Fifth District for this substantial investment shows the importance of the Fifth District’s small businesses and the 182,200 people they employ.”

“We are gratified to be selected for Wells Fargo’s Open for Business Fund program,” said Milton J. Little Jr., president and CEO of United Way of Greater Atlanta. “The Open for Business Fund aligns directly to United Way’s Economic Stability investment priority area, which is focused on ensuring that everyone, regardless of race, identity, or circumstances, has the opportunity to convert increased income to wealth.”

Atlanta small business owners interested in learning more about the program can find information here.

Open for Business Fund grantees are estimated to reach more than 152,000 small business owners nationally and will help entrepreneurs maintain more than 255,000 jobs. Roughly 85% of small business served by grantees are Black, African American, Hispanic, Asian American, and Native American small business owners. Wells Fargo also offers a Small Business Resource Center where entrepreneurs can explore business planning, financing considerations, and practical advice.

The Open for Business Fund grant builds on the bank’s ongoing support of advancing economic opportunity for small businesses in Atlanta, including recent collaborations with organizations such as ACE, Morehouse College, and Operation Hope. Donations to these entities support programs that inspire and sustain future entrepreneurs.

About Wells Fargo

Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE: WFC) is a leading financial services company that has approximately $1.9 trillion in assets, proudly serves one in three U.S. households and more than 10% of small businesses in the U.S., and is the leading middle market banking provider in the U.S. We provide a diversified set of banking, investment and mortgage products and services, as well as consumer and commercial finance, through our four reportable operating segments: Consumer Banking and Lending, Commercial Banking, Corporate and Investment Banking, and Wealth & Investment Management. Wells Fargo ranked No. 37 on Fortune’s 2021 rankings of America’s largest corporations. In the communities we serve, the company focuses its social impact on building a sustainable, inclusive future for all by supporting housing affordability, small business growth, financial health, and a low-carbon economy. News, insights, and perspectives from Wells Fargo are also available at Wells Fargo Stories.

Additional information may be found at www.wellsfargo.com | Twitter: @WellsFargo.

Contact Information

Jacob Jordan, 470-528-8900

Jacob.jordan2@wellsfargo.com

To download program FAQs, please click here.

This year, United Way of Greater Atlanta will provide assistance to more than 381,000 individuals and families across Greater Atlanta’s 13-county region. From the Child Well-Being Mission Fund, the United for Racial Equity and Healing Fund, and the COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund, we’re providing sustainable and equitable improvements for the well-being of children, families and communities.

Because of our generous donors, more children will receive quality childcare, families will receive basic needs and housing, youth receive college planning, and families are provided with tools to build wealth. Read on for some highlights from the last year.

Child Well-Being Mission Fund

The Child Well-Being Mission Fund ensures lasting, equitable and collaborative solutions to the critical problems that stand between us and a better quality of life. The fund includes four investment priorities – Strong Learners, College and Career Ready, Economic Stability, and Brighter Future.

  • $43.92 Million Distributed
  • 223 Nonprofits Funded via 267 Grants
  • 381,000 Services Provided

82% of our grants are direct service grants, which provide active supports, services and/or programming to individuals and families.

Strong Learners 25,703 children will become stronger learners through securing housing and basic needs for their families, providing support to build reading skills, helping to strengthen family engagement, increased access to health services, and access to quality early learning.

College and Career Ready 104,326 youth will be supported for higher education and high-growth careers through strengthened academic support, expanded career pathways, increased college planning and secure housing and basic needs.

Economic Stability 113,062 individuals will gain access to childcare/afterschool care, job skills, financial training, and housing and basic needs, in order to reach economic stability.

Brighter Future 123,389 individuals will be supported through investments that expand key coalitions, increase civic participation, and improve advocacy that directly improves communities in Clayton, South DeKalb, and South Fulton counties.

United for Racial Equity and Healing Fund

Nearly 500,000 children in Greater Atlanta live in communities where the majority of residents are people of color and lack the basic opportunities and resources to thrive. The United for Racial Equity and Healing Fund tackles the systemic issues underlying the correlation between race and zip codes, place and equity.

  • $3 Million Raised
  • 7 Nonprofits Funded Through Initial Grant Round
  • $1.2 Million Granted as Multi-Year Commitments
  • Average Award of $105,889 (Additional round of funding to be considered in Fall 2021)

COVID-19 Response and Recovery

The COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund, in collaboration with Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta, provided support grants to nonprofit organizations to provide services to people in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Fund rapidly distributed dollars to nonprofit organizations so that they could quickly get help to children and families impacted by COVID-19.

  • 14 Million Services Provided
  • $28.2 Million Distributed via 598 Grants
  • 481 Nonprofits Funded

We’ve improved the lives of 82,000 children, but we can do more. We know every child whose life we change will go on to change the lives of countless others, and when we work together our community impact grows exponentially to create an equitable future for all.

Work this important is never over or done alone. Can children, families and Greater Atlanta communities count on you? Unite for more today.

The story was published originally in January 2021 and has been updated as of March 30, 2021.

 

Together, can help families today, tomorrow and in the future achieve economic stability.

This is an important component of improving child well-being because children thrive when their families thrive.

United Way has supported families and provided financial tools and resources for over 100 years. Today, our strategy must reflect the context of the infectious disease COVID-19 — a disease that has now killed hundreds of thousands of people and infected millions over the past year.

We know that the COVID pandemic has had a crushing impact on many industries and left millions of Georgians out of work, but it has had a disproportionate impact on the Black community. This extends to employment and wages, too.

Black worker unemployment has been almost twice as high as unemployment for white workers. This will have a lasting impact on household budgets and the ability of families to rebound.

When the Great Recession began in 2007, Black workers’ unemployment rate increased to double digits and remained that high for more than six years.

In comparison, the unemployment rate among white workers never reached double digits during the Great Recession or its recovery. It took more than 10 years for Black workers’ incomes to return to their pre-recession levels.

But even for those who are working, many are working fewer hours or have experience months without income in 2020. Tax refunds have provided an opportunity for low and moderate-income families to accumulate savings.

However, because so many families worked fewer hours in 2020, they earned less and will not have the additional dollars they may have received in the past.

According to the Center for American Progress, families use tax refunds to improve their economic stability:

  • 84% used part of their refund to pay off a debt
  • 61% used part of their refund for child care expenses
  • 33% used part of their refund to purchase or repair a car
  • 47% put part of their refund aside as savings for goals or future expenses

As a community, United Way donors and volunteers have responded to this crisis with generosity.

We have helped thousands of families by packing snacks for kids, delivering meals, donating to food banks, providing rent assistance and increasing access to health services by providing digital technology.

At United Way of Greater Atlanta, we’re focused on the well-being of children, families and communities across our 13-county region. One of our most important areas of work is economic stability.

Helping families and individuals attain financial security is foundational for our community to thrive. We know that every person whose life we change, will go on to change the lives of countless others. And when we work together—pooling our resources, time and energy—our community impact grows exponentially. United, we can do more for our community.

With your help

United, we can help more than 13,000 families build wealth by expanding outreach across our region so that more families are aware that they can get their taxes done for free. We can provide online resources and virtual tax support through our Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program, along with drop off and limited in-person options during the pandemic.

 $750 ensures that 50 families receive outreach and online tax support. $1,000 would provide financial coaching for 65 families.

We can help more than 2,000 individuals increase their wages and close the skills gap by increasing opportunities for hands-on work experience such as internships and apprenticeships and providing low-wage workers with financial support to secure credentials in high demand careers.

$500 would provide a month of on-the-job training for someone who has been forced to retool and start working in a new industry. $2,500 provides job placement and six months of employment support to enable a young adult or a new parent to be successful in a high-tech job and compete in the marketplace. 

We can help more than 27,000 families secure housing basic needs by ensuring that fundamental elements of life like stable housing, food security and reliable transportation are in place so that families avoid a financial crisis.

$500 can provide 30 days of rent or utility payments for a single mother who has lost her job to help her family avoid eviction.

When we Unite for More, everyone can climb. Work this important is never over or done alone. Can children, families and Greater Atlanta communities count on you? Unite for more today.