Of the 4,500 people signed up for the 21-Day Racial Equity Challenge, hundreds are Cole Society members. We asked Beth Keller from Habitat for Humanity, Richard Tyler from Rollins, and United Way of Greater Atlanta’s Lauren Rock to weigh in about their impressions of the 7-week self-guided learning experience.

How did you find out about the 21 Day Racial Equity Challenge and what made you want to sign-up?

Richard: I heard about it through the United Way email. I thought it would be interesting to see what the topics were and that I could learn some things and possibly share with others.

Beth: I found out about it from Ginneh Baugh at a Cole Women United Cabinet meeting. It is a simple way to educate myself in order to be a stronger advocate, empathetic ally, and a compassionate human-being.

Lauren: I had the opportunity to collaborate with United Way of Greater Atlanta leaders like Kim Addie and Ginneh Baugh to share my perspective and contribute content ideas for a meaningful challenge experience. My first challenge experience was with the YWCA, however, I learned about it at a conference from Dr. Eddie Moore, Jr. and Debby Irving, the educators who originally developed the program. Any opportunity that fosters my continued learning and journey to promote equity I will always sign up.

What lesson have you learned so far that you want more people to know about?

Richard: It has reaffirmed the unfortunate reality that so many things have been baked into our society that have put those already disadvantaged in an even more disadvantaged position, but that good-minded people have been and are still working to correct the courses when and where possible.  But also, that the situation in these aspects is not static but rather are dynamic – that other not so good-minded people are also constantly working to push back progress.

Beth: Redlining in the United States. White Flight in Atlanta. The history of systematic/purposeful housing segregation by the government in the United States and its lasting impact.

Lauren: I am always moved by the moments in history, most recent and distant past, that my fellow BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and other people of color) brothers and sisters have faced. This challenge elevates how generations in Atlanta have faced inequities and other discrimination that we often do not read about in articles or see on social media. I’m grateful that this challenge includes these experiences.