United Way of Greater Atlanta’s Tocqueville Society members understand what a significant gift can help accomplish.

Atlanta’s Tocqueville Society, which was formed in 1985, is named after French politician Alexis de Tocqueville, who recognized the importance of voluntary action. Members of Tocqueville Society are philanthropic leaders in the Atlanta area who contribute $10,000 or more annually to United Way of Greater Atlanta.

According to United Way Worldwide’s annual report, Tocqueville Society has generated more than $10 billion to date. There are 25,000-plus members in 400-plus societies around the world.

In Greater Atlanta, Doug Hutcherson is one of those philanthropic leaders. The CEO of Lockton Companies Southeast has always had ties to United Way.

“I’ve contributed to United Way for many years with former employers — even dating back to elementary school,” Hutcherson says. “United Way was always kind of an omnipresent charitable organization, and we were encouraged to donate money.”

Hutcherson has been CEO of Lockton in Atlanta for the past 16 years. He says he created the Lockton business in Atlanta “from scratch” with 12 people, and now the company is 300-plus strong and has grown with revenues of more than $100 million.

Lockton is headquartered in Kansas City, Missouri, and has always been passionate about service to United Way, Hutcherson says.

“It was a natural extension to Atlanta,” he says. “We carried on that cultural tradition. It was a natural fit.”

But around a decade ago, Hutcherson saw the work United Way of Greater Atlanta does from a different perspective.

Hutcherson had the opportunity to participate in one of United Way’s Street-to-Home outreach projects.

United Way’s Street-to-Home initiative seeks to end homelessness by helping people living on the streets obtain permanent housing and gain access to support programs.

United Way works alongside partner agencies to reach out to homeless communities in Atlanta in hopes of providing them transitional housing, and case management which enables a large majority of individuals to become independent.

The program helps to house hundreds of individuals each year.

During Street-to-Home outreach projects, volunteers will board buses early in the morning and drive around Atlanta to interact with the city’s homeless population. Volunteers such as Hutcherson will ask people if they can help put them in contact with resources.

Hutcherson says he went to United Way of Greater Atlanta early one morning for what he thought would be a discussion about how to provide services that would help the homeless population. It was then that he went into the streets with an ADP escort to directly engage people.

“The reason you go out at 5 o’clock is that you want to get to people before they get on the move,” Hutcherson says. “In those days, you have a group of people walking up to a homeless person on the street, and you can just think what was going through their head — ‘Am I about to be arrested, get beaten up, what’s happening?’

“There was very little trust between the homeless community, but with these outreaches over time, I think that we’ve done a good job of building relationships in this community.”

With these projects, Hutcherson was able to go beyond just giving a monetary gift. In all, he says he’s done about 25 or more of these outreach events, and he took his son out when he was 14 to help instill the importance of service.

This particular project was something that struck a chord with Hutcherson.

He said his office has allocated its United Way Campaign to the program each year since his first experience with Street-to-Home.

Hutcherson now serves on the Tocqueville Society Cabinet. He says he likes serving with other Tocqueville members and sees the group as a good leadership function for the Atlanta business community. He said Tocqueville does a nice job of promoting targeted philanthropy.

“Most Tocqueville Society members are good about sharing within their organizations the importance of philanthropy,” Hutcherson says. “Our company’s three pillars are clients, associates and communities in which we work and live. Giving back to the local community allows for the privilege of prospering in the being the business community.”

Hutcherson says he appreciates the leadership at United Way and called its message — specifically its new Child Well-Being message — an inspiring one.

“I have an inherent trust in United Way,” Hutcherson says. “I think it’s efficiently managed and United Way carries a very powerful brand within the philanthropic world. In Atlanta, I feel like it’s a very well-run organization. I think [President and CEO] Milton [J. Little, Jr.] does a great job, and [Vice President of United Way Regional Commission on Homelessness] Protip Biswas — I’m very impressed with how passionate they are. They believe in the message, which inspires others to act.”

If you are passionate about United Way’s message that all children deserve a chance to reach their full potential, donate to the Child Well-Being Impact Fund. Click here for more information about Tocqueville Society or learn more about how to get involved with United Way’s Street-to-Home initiative and how you can give.

United Way of Greater Atlanta’s Tocqueville Society is a committed leadership group making a measurable and sustainable impact in Greater Atlanta through the connected efforts of their philanthropy. The Cabinet volunteers help uphold this value proposition while advancing the Child Well-Being Movement in our 13-county region.


Tocqueville Women United Chair
Daneen Durr
AT&T

Tocqueville Society Chair
Chris Peck
UPS (Retired)

Ivan Allen Circle Chair
Dan Reardon
North Highland Company

 

David Abee
Synovus

 

Lawrence Ashe
Parker Hudson Ranier & Dobbs

 

Shan Cooper
Atlanta Committee for Progress

 

Amy Corn
Marketing Executive

 

Karen Doolittle
Mercer

 

Kathy Dowling
AT&T (Retired)

 

Steve Evans
Macy’s (Retired)

 

Pat Falotico
Robert K. Greenleaf Center for Servant Leadership

 

Mary Ellen Garrett
The Garrett Group / Merrill Lynch Wealth Management
John Geraghty
SunTrust

 

Doug Gosden
Holland & Knight

 

Jeff Hammond
SVN

 

Tricia Holder
PMH Consulting Partners

 

Doug Hutcherson
Lockton Companies

 

Laura Mills
Grant Thornton

 

Angela Nagy
EY

 

Mike Orr
The Genuine Parts Company

 

Jimmy Palik
EY

 

Charles “Chuck” Palmer
Troutman Sanders

 

Mike Petrik
Alston & Bird LLP

 

Dave Polstra
Brightworth, Inc.

 

Robyn Roberts
RSR Consulting, Inc.

 

Amy Rudolph
Eversheds Sutherland

 

Sylvia Russell
AT&T (Retired)

 

Sidney Simms, Jr.
Eversheds Sutherland

 

Lyn Turknett
Turknett Leadership Group

 

 

For more information, please contact Tocqueville Society Director, Karin Von Kaenel at (404) 527-7227 or kvonkaenel@unitedwayatlanta.org.