Joseph E. Heatherly
Audit Partner, Grant Thornton LLP

Tocqueville Society Member
Young Professional Leaders Advisory Board Member

 

 

Joseph E. Heatherly is an audit partner at Grant Thornton LLP, one of the world’s leading organizations of independent audit, tax and advisory firms.

Joseph began his career at Grant Thornton in September 2004 in Charlotte, NC. After spending several years in the audit division of the firm’s Charlotte, NC, and Columbia, SC offices, he completed a two-year rotation within the firm’s national office. In July 2015, Joseph moved to the Atlanta office of Grant Thornton searching for additional career opportunities and was promoted to audit partner in August 2016. Joseph focuses on serving publicly traded and privately held entities within the transportation, retail, service, and pharmaceutical industries.

In addition to his membership in the Tocqueville Society of United Way Atlanta, Joseph is a member of the Young Professional Leaders Advisory Board of United Way Atlanta and serves as Internal Communications Chair. He is also a member of the 2019 Multiple Sclerosis Leadership Class of Atlanta.

Joseph is a native of Jonesville, SC, and received his Bachelors of Science in Accounting and Masters of Professional Accountancy from Clemson University. He resides with his wife, Caroline, and their daughter in Buckhead.

Lee W. Crump is the CIO and Group Vice President of Business Support for Rollins, Inc. Rollins is an S&P500 company based in Atlanta, has annual revenues of over $1.8 billion and is the parent company of Orkin Pest Control, HomeTeam Pest Defense, and other well-known pest control companies. Prior to joining Rollins in 2009 Crump spent ten years as the CIO of the largest and most profitable ServiceMaster subsidiary based in Memphis, TN.  In 2012 Crump was named Georgia CIO of the Year (Global Division) by the GeorgiaCIO Association.

Lee serves as the Board Chair for Year-Up, Atlanta and is a member of the Board of Directors for PowerMyLearning , Atlanta where he is Resource Development Committee Chair. He serves on the Advisory Boards of the GeorgiaCIO Association where he is Board Chair Emeritus, and the Association of Telecommunications Professionals (ATP). He is a past Board Member of Georgia Junior Achievement and CHRIS Kids. He is a volunteer and mentor for Pathbuilders Achieva, as well as Year-Up Atlanta, where in 2013 he received the Year-Up Urban Empowerment Award.

He is a member of American Mensa, the GeorgiaCIO Association, the Project Management Institute (PMI), the Technology Association of Georgia, (TAG), the Association of Telecommunications Professionals (ATP), and the Society of Information Managers (SIM).

He and his wife Tracy reside in Brookhaven. When he’s not working, you can find Lee on the golf course or practicing blues riffs on the electric guitar.

On January 24, 2019, we were pleased to celebrate the new year by welcoming our new Tocqueville Society members. Thank you to all who attended!

United Way of Greater Atlanta’s Tocqueville Society, the largest Tocqueville Society in the United States, is a committed leadership group making a measurable and sustainable impact on Child Well-Being in Greater Atlanta through the connected efforts of their philanthropy. The Tocqueville Society is open to individuals who contribute $10,000 or more annually to United Way of Greater Atlanta.

For more information, please email tocqueville@unitedwayatlanta.org.

Erika Ford Preval is a leading source for modern and approachable events in etiquette and lifestyle for youth and adults. As Founder of Charm Etiquette, she has delivered expert advice that has improved the social skills and enhanced both the personal and professional lives of guests – from Fortune 100 companies to scholar athletes attending top universities.

While the ideals of leadership, lifestyle, and proper etiquette are a major focus, Erika also strives to foster a sense of community by hosting curated small group events within partner restaurant locations throughout Atlanta. Known for making it “cool to be cordial” her teaching methods are anything but stuffy and rigid – they’re relevant, fun and memorable experiences. After attending Charm events, guests are confident in navigating among any group of people – whether attending a State Dinner at the White House or a casual dinner at Waffle House.

Erika also shares her modern spin on manners through her blog, Erika Preval: simply put and as a contributing writer for Southern Living. She has become a credible “go-to” resource for national media and highly regarded resources like Zagat, the Chicago Tribune and CNN. Her local press features include the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, StyleBlueprint, The Atlantan and Atlanta Magazine. Founded in 2013, Charm Etiquette was named Best Classes and Workshops by Best Self Magazine and Erika has been recognized with honors from numerous organizations, including Georgia Tech University’s Women Out Front. 

Erika holds a degree in Economics and International Relations from Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia, and Certification in Japanese Language and Culture from Nanzan University in Nagoya, Japan. 

A long-time supporter of the United Way of Greater Atlanta, she serves as a member of the Cole Women United Cabinet as well as its Board of Directors. She is also a Summer 2014 United Way VIP Alumni. Coincidentally, her daughter served on the inaugural Youth United Board. 

Her passion for youth and community is evidenced by years of continued service and philanthropy in Atlanta. Erika is a Lifetime Member and serves on the Board of Directors of the Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta. She is also a member of the Junior League of Atlanta and Atlanta Woman’s Club. In the same year that Charm Etiquette was launched, Erika provided ideation and initial funding to Spelman College for what would grow to become the Spelpreneur program – fostering entrepreneurship and innovation amongst its students.

Erika resides in Atlanta with her husband, John, and two teenage daughters.

A child is the product of his or her community.

This was what United Way of Greater Atlanta saw at the end of its last strategic planning meeting. They saw that children growing up in Greater Atlanta’s 13 counties were given a disadvantage based on the zip code where they were born.

In order to help these communities, though, you need funding. You need people who understand the significance of a gift, and no group of donors gives more to the United Way than members of Tocqueville Society.

United Way uses 14 different data-driven child, community and family measures to determine an overall “Child Well-Being” score for each zip code in our 13-county region — United Way now has a shared agenda, and a way to leverage your donations in order to maximize the impact and reverse the implications of the Child Well-Being score. By using the child as the lens, United Way can then identify the big picture needs of the community.

Tocqueville Society members understand the impact a significant gift can make. Tocqueville Society is named after French politician Alexis de Tocqueville, who recognized the importance of voluntary action. Our local society was created in 1985. Members of Tocqueville Society are philanthropic leaders in the Atlanta area who contribute $10,000 or more annually to United Way of Greater Atlanta.

There is also a step-up match program that gets members in on the ground floor with donations of $5,000 in the first year, and a promise to increase that total to $6,500, $8,000 and then up to $10,000 in subsequent years. At least half of that first donation is allocated toward the Child Well-Being Impact Fund.

According to United Way Worldwide’s annual report, Tocqueville Society has generated more than $10 billion to date. There are 25,000-plus members in 400-plus societies around the world.

“We generate $14 million annually,” said United Way Senior Major Gifts Officer Yael Sherman. “We have 1,038 members.”

The affinity group increases in size and amount given each year. Sherman, Major Gifts Officer Sarah Massey and Tocqueville Society Director Karin Von Kaenel, recruit new members from existing corporate partners or through the “organic nature of the campaign.”

Tocqueville members are invited to First Tuesday luncheons where they can hear from prominent members of the community. There’s also an annual Tocqueville Awards Reception and other exclusive events such as a New Members Social and Mentoring Mixer with members of Young Professional Leaders.

“I feel like we have enough events to keep people engaged,” Massey said. “The people we are dealing with are very busy, so we have to stay busy to keep them engaged.”

Networking with like-minded people who are leaders in Atlanta is one of the major selling points for new Tocqueville members, Von Kaenel said.

“In addition to some of the benefits, it’s a wonderful peer network,” Von Kaenel says. “People at this level —if you give at this level— you really find value in knowing your investment is being allocated in the best way possible.”

Part of this comes from being able to explain to explain the impact a donation can make toward improving the well-being of children in Atlanta. Sherman spends a lot of time talking to members about the importance of the Child Well-Being Impact Fund.

“We talk to [Tocqueville Society members] about the importance of child well-being, and that in order to reverse this you need to look at ending generational poverty,” Sherman said. “If you want these children to be able to reach their full potential, then you have to improve the child well-being. If want an educated workforce, then we need to train these children to be tomorrow’s career-minded individuals.”

Sherman said we can’t continue to thrive and be a “Number 1 city” if we can’t improve the well-being of our children for the future.

“All of these [Child Well-Being] indicators predict outcomes,” Sherman said. “When we talk to people, it depends on where they are coming from and where their interests are. We show them where the Child Well-Being Agenda fits into that.”

The Child Well-Being heat map has been an excellent tool in ensuring them that their money would be used for the best impact, Massey said.

“We’ve really shifted to the whole data-driven approach,” Massey said. “That’s what has enabled us to develop the heat map, which has been an incredible tool for us. Every donor lives in one of our 13 counties. They are on that map and their children are measured on that map, and that’s why they should care.”

Tocqueville Society members know that this is bigger than just giving an individual gift. They have the chance to be a part of real change in their community.

“I want people to join Tocqueville Society because they know they can make a difference and be a part of something bigger and be a part of the biggest Tocqueville Society in the country,” Massey said. “It sends a clear message to your community that you care. This is a society of business-minded people who want to be smart about their philanthropic decisions, and they want their dollars to go as far as they can.”

For more info about Tocqueville Society, click here.

William “Bill” Cheeks is President of ABBA Associates Inc., a fiscal management consultant firm that provides counseling and conducts seminars nationwide to help consumers map a successful Life Plan.  

Bill joined Equifax, Inc. in October 1967 and held key management positions in New York, NY, Worcester, MA, Albany, NY, and West Palm Beach, FL. After relocating to Atlanta, he held the title of Vice President of Consumer Education from 1995 to 2001. He was responsible for implementing a fiscal management and life skills program for high school students.   

In addition to his service for United Way of Greater Atlanta, Bill is actively involved with the Boys and Girls Club of Cobb County, BUY Inc, Operation Hope, eCredable Inc, and the Georgia Civic Affairs Foundation. Past involvement includes leadership roles with the Atlanta Private Industry Council; American Collectors Association; State YMCA; Georgia Council on Economic Education; Communities In Schools of Cobb County; Cobb County Workforce Investment Board; Blue Ribbon Committee for Cobb County School System and Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc.    

Bill is a native of Woodruff, SC, was educated at Johnson C. Smith University, Masters Management Program in Human Resources at Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, and numerous Executive Management Programs. He is married to Barbara, has one son and resides in Powder Springs, GA.

On October 17th, society members gathered at the Cherokee Town Club for our annual Tocqueville Recognition Reception. During the award ceremony, we discovered unexpected reasons to be thankful.

The Tocqueville Society Award was granted to Mike and Susan Petrik. Each year this award is presented to a member or family who dedicates extraordinary time, talent and treasures throughout the Greater Atlanta community.

The Petriks joined the Tocqueville Society in 1998 and the Ivan Allen Circle in 2012. From 2008-2017, Mike served as the Board Chair, Governance Chair, and Public Policy Chair, all while demonstrating tremendous leadership as part of Alston & Bird’s campaign. In his remarks, Mike shared that the evening was made even more special by the news he and Susan had learned at the doctor’s office just hours before – officially in remission, Susan is now cancer-free.    

We also welcomed former United Way of Greater Atlanta President and CEO, Mark O’Connell, to present the Community Impact award named in his honor. The partner selected for this award shows an above-and-beyond commitment to improving Child Well-Being in our region. The winner, Communities in Schools of Atlanta, was represented by Executive Director, Frank Brown. With tears in his eyes, he expressed gratitude and passion for the students served by the organization – 96 percent of whom were promoted to the next grade level or graduated from high school.  

The program concluded with remarks from Peter Buffett, personally inviting members to attend “A Concert & Conversation” at Morehouse College the following night. Read more here.

Check out photos from the two evening event with Peter Buffett.

Tricia Holder is currently a United Way of Greater Atlanta Tocqueville Cabinet member. She serves on the Growth Committee and the Host Committee for Women’s Leadership Breakfast. Her other nonprofit involvement includes her role as President of the Atlanta Women’s Network.

Tricia has over 22 years of management and business development experience and over 12 years of human resource consulting experience, providing solutions to clients across the country. As a Managing Partner with Media Technology Associates, she handled national accounts including Turner Broadcasting, HDTV, COX, Discovery Channel, etc. She developed and implemented marketing plans to continuously keep clients and prospects informed of industry changes and services that met their evolving needs. Tricia has also provided business development services for MI Holdings, Inc. for the past 15 years. 

An Atlanta native, she attended Marist High School and holds a Bachelor’s degree from Vanderbilt University.  She has two kids and lives with her husband in Atlanta.

 Dave Polstra has been a Tocqueville Society and Ivan Allen Circle member since 2010, and he currently serves on the Tocqueville Cabinet as Chair of the Creative Giving Committee. As Co-Founder of Brightworth, Dave brings more than 30 years of experience, wisdom and insight in the wealth management field.

A personal Wealth Advisor to high-net-worth families since 1981, Dave provides comprehensive financial and investment advice, specializing in retirement transition planning, executive compensation, estate planning and charitable planning. He is a well-known speaker at national conferences, where he teaches retirement plan distribution and wealth transfer strategies to attorneys, CPAs and financial advisors.  

Dave currently serves on the board of the Atlanta Estate Planning Council. He is also the past chairman of the board of Eagle Ranch Children’s Home and the Eagle Ranch Foundation. He currently serves as chairman of the board for Medical Missions Ministries (MMM), an organization that provides free medical care to the poor living in rural Guatemala. In 2011, Dave received the Global Community Impact Award from Invest in Others Charitable Foundation for his work with MMM.

Dave and his wife, Betsy, have three adult children and are active members of Perimeter Church in Johns Creek. His hobbies include jogging, waterskiing, wake surfing and vineyard cultivation.